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How do you convert System::String to std::string in C++ .NET?

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5  
Don't. Convert to std::wstring. System.String is Unicode, not ASCII –  MSalters Aug 20 '09 at 7:54
2  
@MSalters Huh? You seem to be under the impression that conversion doesn't include translation or that everyone can always choose what API's they're going to interact with... –  user645280 Mar 18 '13 at 18:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 35 down vote accepted

There is cleaner syntax if you're using a recent version of .net

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <string>

#include <msclr\marshal_cppstd.h>

using namespace System;

int main(array<System::String ^> ^args)
{
    System::String^ managedString = "test";

    msclr::interop::marshal_context context;
    std::string standardString = context.marshal_as<std::string>(managedString);

    return 0;
}

This also gives you better clean-up in the face of exceptions.

There is an msdn article for various other conversions

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And in response to the "easier way" in later versions of C++/CLI, you can do it without the marshal_context. I know this works in Visual Studio 2010; not sure about prior to that.


#include "stdafx.h"
#include <string>

#include <msclr\marshal_cppstd.h>

using namespace msclr::interop;

int main(array<System::String ^> ^args)
{
    System::String^ managedString = "test";

    std::string standardString = marshal_as<std::string>(managedString);

    return 0;
}

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1  
Look at the MSDN article Collin linked to to see when to use marshal_as and when to use the marshal_context. Generally speaking the marshal_context is needed when unmanaged resources need to cleaned up. –  rotti2 Apr 29 '10 at 10:28
2  
The article says one only needs a context if the native type does not have a destructor to do its own cleanup. So, in the case of std::string, is this needed? –  Kristopher Johnson May 4 '11 at 17:39
1  
The context is not needed for std::string. Context is only needed when marshaling from a wrapped type to an unwrapped type (i.e. raw pointer). As listed in Overview of Marshaling in C++, there are only three instances where the context is needed. –  Edward Brey Jan 11 '13 at 12:45
stdString = toss(systemString);

  static std::string toss( System::String ^ s )
  {
    // convert .NET System::String to std::string
    const char* cstr = (const char*) (Marshal::StringToHGlobalAnsi(s)).ToPointer();
    std::string sstr = cstr;
    Marshal::FreeHGlobal(System::IntPtr((void*)cstr));
    return sstr;
  }
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1  
This is the older syntax. I prefer the one that Colin suggested above. –  orad Aug 2 '12 at 0:55
    
What if sstr() throws? Wouldn't that cause cstr to become a leak? –  user645280 Mar 18 '13 at 19:04

I had too many ambiguous errors showing up with the above answers ( yes, i'm a C++ noob)

This worked for me for sending string from C# to C++ CLI

C#

bool result;
result = mps.Import(mpsToolName);

C++ CLI

function:

bool ManagedMPS::Import(System::String^ mpsToolNameTest)
std::string mpsToolName;
mpsToolName = toStandardString(mpsToolNameTest);

function that works from converting String^ to std::string

static std::string toStandardString(System::String^ string)
{
 using System::Runtime::InteropServices::Marshal;
 System::IntPtr pointer = Marshal::StringToHGlobalAnsi(string);
 char* charPointer = reinterpret_cast<char*>(pointer.ToPointer());
 std::string returnString(charPointer, string->Length);
 Marshal::FreeHGlobal(pointer);
 return returnString;
}

ON FURTHER RESEARCH, it appears that this is cleaner and safer.

I switched to using this method instead.

std::string Utils::ToUnmanagedString(String^ stringIncoming)
{
   std::string unmanagedString = marshal_as<std::string>(stringIncoming);
   return unmanagedString;
}
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So how did you manage to get rid of all the IServiceProvider ambiguity errors? –  Arman Bimatov Aug 17 '13 at 18:21
    
I don't recall getting those errors. I was new to C++ , now I'm on another contract/project with different company.... sorry best of luck. –  Tom Stickel Aug 17 '13 at 19:20

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