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I'm using spawn_link but doesn't understand its behavior. Consider the following code:

-module(test).
-export([try_spawn_link/0]).

try_spawn_link() ->
  spawn(fun() ->
    io:format("parent: ~p~n", [Parent = self()]),
    Client = spawn_link(fun() ->
      io:format("child: ~p~n", [self()]),
      spawn_link_loop(Parent)
    end),
    spawn_link_loop(Client)
  end).

spawn_link_loop(Peer) ->
  receive
    quit ->
      exit(normal);
    Any ->
      io:format("~p receives ~p~n", [self(), Any])
  end,
  spawn_link_loop(Peer).

From the Erlang documentation, a link is created between the calling process and the new process, atomically. However, I tested as follows and didn't notice the effect of the link.

1> test:try_spawn_link().
parent: <0.34.0>
<0.34.0>
child: <0.35.0>
2> is_process_alive(pid(0,34,0)).
true
3> is_process_alive(pid(0,35,0)).
true
4> pid(0,35,0) ! quit.
quit
5> is_process_alive(pid(0,35,0)).
false
6> is_process_alive(pid(0,34,0)).
true

1> test:try_spawn_link().
parent: <0.34.0>
<0.34.0>
child: <0.35.0>
2> is_process_alive(pid(0,34,0)).
true
3> is_process_alive(pid(0,35,0)).
true
4> pid(0,34,0) ! quit.
quit
5> is_process_alive(pid(0,35,0)).
true
6> is_process_alive(pid(0,34,0)).
false

In my understanding, if one peer of the link exits, the other peer exits (or is notified to exit). But the results seem different from my understanding.

EDIT: thanks to the answers of legoscia and Pascal.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As described in the "Error handling" section of the Processes chapter of the Erlang reference manual, a linked process exiting causes its linked processes to exit only if the exit reason is not normal. That's why OTP extensively uses the shutdown exit reason.

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Accept this as the answer for your extensive explanation. –  Xiao Jia Oct 22 '12 at 9:32

It is because you have chosen to use exit(normal). In this case the other process will not stop. If you use for example exit(killed) then you will get the behavior you are expecting.

You can use monitor to get informed about normal termination.

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Upvote for the simple instruction to get it work. –  Xiao Jia Oct 22 '12 at 9:32

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