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I am using a right-to-left language with dir='rtl' on the body element.

So the whole page flows as it should from right to left.

For some reason alt text within images are displayed backwards.

Here's a jsFiddle.

Any simple solution?

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That's what adding dir="rtl" does... –  BenM Oct 22 '12 at 9:13
    
@Ben please look at the fiddle and you'll see the problem –  Danield Oct 22 '12 at 9:16
    
I have no idea what is causing this as I never read or wrote in this kind of language, but even without dir="rtl" it is written differently. –  Salketer Oct 22 '12 at 9:16
    
So what is the solution that you want? –  BenM Oct 22 '12 at 9:16
2  
Even if you remove the dir attribute, the text displays the same. Adding in English characters works fine... It must be a rendering issue. –  BenM Oct 22 '12 at 9:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is a bug in Chromium, reported in 2010 as RTL: Hebrew alt text rendered left-to-right when images disabled, with apparently no progress.

By the specifications, text entirely in Hebrew letters is to be displayed right to left independently of dir attribute settings. In some browsers, dir=rtl helps, but not here. For some reason, alt text rendering in Chrome does not apply directionality information the same ways as normal text rendering does – after all, it probably uses separate routines internally. Using control characters for directionality inside the attribute value does not help.

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+1 thanks, @Jukka , so you're basically saying that there's no easy fix for chrome as yet? –  Danield Oct 22 '12 at 13:14
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@Danield, I’m afraid so. (I don’t dare to even think of suggesting “Visual Hebrew”...) What really puzzles me is that Chrome gets Arabic text in alt attributes right; alt="مدن" causes the characters to be rendered right to left. –  Jukka K. Korpela Oct 22 '12 at 13:23
    
vote for the chromium bug! –  djsadinoff Jan 30 '13 at 14:54

Everything looks OK for me in Firefox and IE. The problem with the alt text seems to only exist in Google Chrome. I suspect it's some kind of bug in Chrome (or WebKit, as Safari also exhibits the problem).

You could try setting character encoding on the document, which should fix the problem, apparently:

Correct page encoding

The Symptom:

Your page looks garbled in Google Chrome. Garbage characters may be displayed, and RTL language pages (e.g. Hebrew or Arabic) may appear with their letters reversed.

The problem:

If character encoding is not specified precisely, different browsers can interpret the encoding in different ways or not at all. The impact on users is dire since it prevents them from viewing the site.

Recommendations:

Declare your page's content-type correctly, this can either be in an HTTP header or a Meta tag specified in your HTML. The character set your page uses must be a legal value from the Official IANA List, please only use the encodings that have the text (preferred MIME name) listed next to them e.g. ISO-8859-1, Shift_JIS. If you specify two different values for the character encoding in the HTTP Header and the Meta tag, Google Chrome will use the value in the HTTP Header. Conflicting declarations of character encoding in the HTTP Header and Meta tag is asking for trouble. More information on this subject can be found here. We recommend using UTF-8 for all Web content. If you have to use legacy encoding for some reason, make sure to identify the encoding correctly as outlined above. For legacy situations involving Hebrew sites use Logical Hebrew encoding (ISO-8859-8-I). We strongly discourage the use of Visual Hebrew encoding (ISO-8859-8). It has no place on the Web anymore and is a remnant of old systems lacking logic for rendering RTL text. It causes many bugs and lots of confusion.

The above was taken from > http://www.chromium.org/Home/chromecompatfaq

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+1 thanks, any idea if there's a workaround for chrome? –  Danield Oct 22 '12 at 9:28
    
Forgive my ignorance, what alphabet are the characters from? –  BenM Oct 22 '12 at 9:29
    
The language is Hebrew –  Danield Oct 22 '12 at 9:29
    
See my revised answer. –  BenM Oct 22 '12 at 9:32
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The information given about encodings and directionality in the answer and comments is as such correct and useful, but it does not seem to relate to the problem at hand. It’s the people who programmed Chrome that should have read the directionality tutorial! –  Jukka K. Korpela Oct 22 '12 at 13:06

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