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I'm using html5 canvas based image uploads with base64 encoding (default). server-side: when a request is posted base64 headers are removed and base64_decode function (eval php function is not used at all) is applied and saved as jpg directly onto filesystem.

Since i'm saving uploaded file as an exact copy of what is uploaded. if a user uploads a malicious php/js file masqueraded as jpg and a visitor views that bad jpg is this a security risk? if yes I'll process uploaded file with gd. after gd-processed i assume those will be gone.

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security risk for who? –  MaVRoSCy Oct 22 '12 at 10:01
    
for me or user but that does not change the outcome since solution is processing all uploads with gd. –  opteronn Oct 22 '12 at 10:09

1 Answer 1

Since i'm saving uploaded file as an exact copy of what is uploaded.

Then you have all the problems you get when dealing with any kind of file upload. There is nothing specific to HTML 5 here.

if a user uploads a malicious php/js file masqueraded as jpg and a visitor views that bad jpg is this a security risk?

Assuming that you deliver it over HTTP with an image/jpeg content-type — no.

However, there have been problems in the past with buffer overflow based vulnerabilities in image libraries, so it is theoretically possible (albeit unlikely) that a specially crafted JPEG could exploit a security vulnerability in an end viewer's system.

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"Assuming that you deliver it over HTTP with an image/jpeg content-type — no." i don't think answer is a straight no that's why asked. –  opteronn Oct 22 '12 at 10:11
    
@opteronn — Given that scenario and that assumption, the answer is a straight "no". –  Quentin Oct 22 '12 at 10:13
    
"Then you have all the problems you get when dealing with any kind of file upload. There is nothing specific to HTML 5 here." html5 because of default usage of base64 encoding in toDataURL() method. –  opteronn Oct 22 '12 at 10:13
    
@opteronn — You have to decode the data from base64 back to a binary. Then you have a file and everything is the same as for any other file upload. –  Quentin Oct 22 '12 at 10:14
    
a scenario might be putting a specially crafted gif file as valid jpg. –  opteronn Oct 22 '12 at 10:15

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