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In short: I want to cluster a directory filled with lots of photos to get groups of roughly three photos each. (Every cluster goes on one page of soon-to-exist photo book.)

I've looked around and found some links/approaches:

  • Wikipedia lists this feature as "future of image organization".
  • there are some old (2003) papers on this topic, e.g. here.
  • I'm aware of photo album software equipped with elementary versions. So, there are already solutions. (Of course, it is not clear if they are just using some threshold method for inter-photo time difference.)
  • You can easily sort (and move) photos by date: using shell or exiftool. (sorry, cannot post links here as I am limited to two links. But a simple search will do it.)

However, they aren't satisfying enough. So my question is:

Are there software bundles or plugins or scripts (preferably open source) implementing temporal or event clustering algorithms?

EDIT:

Ok, let's make an example. Say you're on a trip to ... Venice. We cut to a single day (day sorting is pretty easy). We take some pictures here and there and then visit Piazza San Marco (often known in English as St Mark's Square). St. Mark's basilica is our first target, then one picture of the clock tower. We take the time for a coffee, get up again and "shoot" the pigeons and again the basilica.

So we have some similar photos (of the basilica), but not in chronologic order. And we have some other pictures chronologicly close together. Now it would be nice to have the basilica on the left side of a photo album and the pigeons and clock tower on the right.

And yes, this sure can be done manually, but that was not part of the question: explicitly an automated way is needed.

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1 Answer 1

You probably don't want to cluster the data, but to do some kind of interval split.

I.e. you preserve the original temporal ordering, and try to split the images when one image does not match the previous one well enough. That makes things a lot easier, as you maybe can get away with comparing each image to the preceding only, instead of comparing any 2 with each other.

Try any of the mentioned methods to compute image similarity. Color histograms probably is a good start. Sort all images by time, compute the similarity to the preceding and plot these. Then check if you can visually see good split points in your data. If you can't see them, don't expect a program to be able to find them either.

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Ok, let's make an example. Say you're on a trip to ... Venice. We cut to a single day (day sorting is pretty easy). We take some pictures here and there and then visit Piazza San Marco (often known in English as St Mark's Square). St. Mark's basilica is our first target, then one picture of the clock tower. We take the time for a coffee, get up again and "shoot" the pigeons and again the basilica. –  whitedwarf Oct 24 '12 at 7:04
    
(Can't edit the comment, sorry.) I've made some additions. Please see above. –  whitedwarf Oct 24 '12 at 7:12
    
A clustering algorithm will likely not be able to tell different churches apart without a lot of data. So unless you want all your churches to be on successive pages, I'd essentially stick to chronological order. Because how should the algorithm tell you havn't been doing church1, tower1, church2, pidgeons, church3? –  Anony-Mousse Oct 24 '12 at 7:19
    
Well, I did not say it would be easy :) However, I do have some possibilities in mind to tell church1 and church2 apart: (you already mentioned) color histograms, some kind of pattern recognition, maybe in conjunction with 3D-remapping, ... –  whitedwarf Oct 24 '12 at 8:04
    
I've worked with these things. They are not half as reliable as you imagine. They work on huge data sets, but not on album-size photo collections. Take the Notre Dame Photosynth example, they discarded hundreds of photos (I believe a third of the total or so). –  Anony-Mousse Oct 24 '12 at 8:12

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