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i want to subsequently extract the text snippet between two paths in a long string.

Therefore, I use something like this:

while($data=~ m/\"(.:\\.*?)\".:\\/sg){...}

`\".:\\(.*?) is a path with a " before. and, since the part between the two paths can be any characters, I finish the regular expression with the start of the next path: \".:\\

Unfortunately like this the code skips always one match. I believe, that this is, because the subsequent search will start after the last \".:\\ and therefore it will only find the next one.

How can I make sure, that the poisition pointer for the search is set back to before the last part of the regular expression (before: \".:\\)

Edit:

"y:\car\main.cs@@jung" "Added format of version number to all sub-parts.

"Hallo Peter"

@@@ "tool kit" @@@"

"y:\car\main.cs@@kkla" (lkaskdn awdiwj)

"The filter "function of the new version works with Excel 2007"only,
but is the correct filter structure.

@@@ "Huihu boy" @@@"

This file should give me two results in $1:

1.

y:\car\main.cs@@jung" "Added format of version number to all sub-parts.

"Hallo Peter"

@@@ "tool kit" @@@"

2.

y:\car\main.cs@@kkla" (lkaskdn awdiwj)

"The filter "function of the new version works with Excel 2007"only,
but is the correct filter structure.

@@@ "Huihu boy" @@@"

but it would only give me the first.

share|improve this question
    
Hi, you are right it is low. but what, if the answers are not good enough? –  Vladimir S. Oct 22 '12 at 10:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What you want is a look-ahead assertion. This matches something after your pattern without including the "something" in your match. The syntax is:

(?=...)

I don't have sample data for your regex, so here is a simple example instead:

use strict;
use warnings;

my $string = "foobarbarbarnbar";

print "Regular matches: ";
#regular matching
while ($string =~ /(\w+?)bar/g)
{
   print " $1"; 
}
#lookahead
print "\nLookahead matches: ";
while ($string =~ /(\w+?)(?=bar)/g)
{
   print " $1"; 
}

Output:

Regular matches:  foo bar n 
Lookahead matches:  foo bar bar barn
share|improve this answer
    
great! It is really hard to find something if you do not know these expressions as lookahead match ;) Thank you so much! –  Vladimir S. Oct 22 '12 at 11:35

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