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I'm using Java to parse strings input by the user, representing either single numeric values or ranges. The user can input the following string:

10-19

And his intention is to use whole numbers from 10-19 --> 10,11,12...19

The user can also specify a list of numbers:

10,15,19

Or a combination of the above:

10-19,25,33

Is there a convenient method, perhaps based on regular expressions, to perform this parsing? Or must I split the string using String.split(), then manually iterate the special signs (',' and '-' in this case)?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

This is how I would go about it:

  1. Split using the , as a delimiter.
  2. If it matches this regular expression: ^(\\d+)-(\\d+)$, then I know I have a range. I would then extract the numbers and create my range (it might be a good idea to make sure that the first digit is lower than the second digit, because you never know...). You then act accordingly.
  3. If it matches this regular expression: ^\\d+$ I would know I have only 1 number, so I have a specific page. I would then act accordingly.
share|improve this answer
    
best approach imo –  Gunther Struyf Oct 22 '12 at 12:47
    
Thanks @npinti. I'll do it like you suggested. Somehow I thought that regular expressions could solve this problem without additional code (in Matlab for example you can write a string containing "10-19,25,33" , run eval() on the string and the result will be the requested range). –  dzisner Oct 22 '12 at 18:45

This tested (and fully commented) regex solution meets the OP requirements:

Java regex solution

// TEST.java 20121024_0700
import java.util.regex.*;
public class TEST {
    public static Boolean isValidIntRangeInput(String text) {
        Pattern re_valid = Pattern.compile(
            "# Validate comma separated integers/integer ranges.\n" +
            "^             # Anchor to start of string.         \n" +
            "[0-9]+        # Integer of 1st value (required).   \n" +
            "(?:           # Range for 1st value (optional).    \n" +
            "  -           # Dash separates range integer.      \n" +
            "  [0-9]+      # Range integer of 1st value.        \n" +
            ")?            # Range for 1st value (optional).    \n" +
            "(?:           # Zero or more additional values.    \n" +
            "  ,           # Comma separates additional values. \n" +
            "  [0-9]+      # Integer of extra value (required). \n" +
            "  (?:         # Range for extra value (optional).  \n" +
            "    -         # Dash separates range integer.      \n" +
            "    [0-9]+    # Range integer of extra value.      \n" +
            "  )?          # Range for extra value (optional).  \n" +
            ")*            # Zero or more additional values.    \n" +
            "$             # Anchor to end of string.           ", 
            Pattern.COMMENTS);
        Matcher m = re_valid.matcher(text);
        if (m.matches())    return true;
        else                return false;
    }
    public static void printIntRanges(String text) {
        Pattern re_next_val = Pattern.compile(
            "# extract next integers/integer range value.    \n" +
            "([0-9]+)      # $1: 1st integer (Base).         \n" +
            "(?:           # Range for value (optional).     \n" +
            "  -           # Dash separates range integer.   \n" +
            "  ([0-9]+)    # $2: 2nd integer (Range)         \n" +
            ")?            # Range for value (optional). \n" +
            "(?:,|$)       # End on comma or string end.", 
            Pattern.COMMENTS);
        Matcher m = re_next_val.matcher(text);
        String msg;
        int i = 0;
        while (m.find()) {
            msg = "  value["+ ++i +"] ibase="+ m.group(1);
            if (m.group(2) != null) {
                msg += " range="+ m.group(2);
            };
            System.out.println(msg);
        }
    }
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String[] arr = new String[] 
                { // Valid inputs:
                    "1", 
                    "1,2,3",
                    "1-9",
                    "1-9,10-19,20-199",
                    "1-8,9,10-18,19,20-199",
                  // Invalid inputs:
                    "A", 
                    "1,2,",
                    "1 - 9",
                    " ",
                    ""
                };
        // Loop through all test input strings:
        int i = 0;
        for (String s : arr) {
            String msg = "String["+ ++i +"] = \""+ s +"\" is ";
            if (isValidIntRangeInput(s)) {
                // Valid input line
                System.out.println(msg +"valid input. Parsing...");
                printIntRanges(s);
            } else {
                // Match attempt failed
                System.out.println(msg +"NOT valid input.");
            } 
        }
    }
}

Output:

r'''
String[1] = "1" is valid input. Parsing...
  value[1] ibase=1
String[2] = "1,2,3" is valid input. Parsing...
  value[1] ibase=1
  value[2] ibase=2
  value[3] ibase=3
String[3] = "1-9" is valid input. Parsing...
  value[1] ibase=1 range=9
String[4] = "1-9,10-19,20-199" is valid input. Parsing...
  value[1] ibase=1 range=9
  value[2] ibase=10 range=19
  value[3] ibase=20 range=199
String[5] = "1-8,9,10-18,19,20-199" is valid input. Parsing...
  value[1] ibase=1 range=8
  value[2] ibase=9
  value[3] ibase=10 range=18
  value[4] ibase=19
  value[5] ibase=20 range=199
String[6] = "A" is NOT valid input.
String[7] = "1,2," is NOT valid input.
String[8] = "1 - 9" is NOT valid input.
String[9] = " " is NOT valid input.
String[10] = "" is NOT valid input.
'''

Note that this solution simply demonstrates how to validate an input line and how to parse/extract value components from each line. It does not further validate that for range values the second integer is larger than the first. This logic check however, could be easily added.

Edit:2012-10-24 07:00 Fixed index i to count from zero.

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That is an elegant solution! +1 (I always liked regular expressions, despite Jamie Zawinski's famous quote). –  Ralph Mar 5 at 14:14

You can use

strinput = '10-19,25,33'
eval(cat(2,'[',strrep(strinput,'-',':'),']'))

Best is to include some input checks, also negative numbers will give problems with this method.

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doesn't your reply refer to Matlab? I was asking about Java –  dzisner Oct 29 '12 at 10:43
    
yes, because you tagged your answer as matlab, which itself is based on java. –  Gunther Struyf Oct 29 '12 at 10:59

In a simplest approach you can use the evil eval for this

A = eval('[10:19,25,33]')

A =

   10    11    12    13    14    15    16    17    18    19    25    33

BUT of course you should think twice before you do that. Especially if this is a user-supplied string! Imagine what would happen if the user supplied any other command...

eval('!rm -rf /')

You would have to make sure that there really is nothing else than what you want. You could do this by regexp.

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Java doesn't have eval() - well, at least not in such easy to use form, are you sure you're not mixing Java with some other language such as JavaScript? –  Esko May 12 '14 at 15:03
    
@esko check the tags before the last edit. It says matlab. –  angainor May 12 '14 at 20:24
    
Huh, that changes the context entirely. I can see how the original editor came to conclusion that matlab is irrelevant here though. –  Esko May 17 '14 at 17:01

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