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I've got a sequence of directories

079/af3
100/af4
120/af3
  . 
  .
  .

Each ???/af? directory contains a very long file results.stdout. Close to the end of this file, one finds the string

 Normal termination: iterations complete!

if the computation in af3 (resp. af4) was successful, otherwise one or more error messages are written in the file. To avoid having to check each file by hand, I'm writing a script which generates a summary file:

 Massflow        af3      af4 
      079    Success  Failure
      100    Failure  Success
      120    Success  Success
        .      .       .
        .      .       .

So far, I've been able to cook up the following:

#!/bin/bash

strlen="9" # want to keep the format flexible, instead than hardcode it
format0="%"$strlen"s %"$strlen"s %"$strlen"s\n"
# write the header of file summary
awk -v format="$format0" ' BEGIN { printf format, "Massflow", "af3", "af4"
                             } ' >> summary


for dir in ??? # loop on all the directories
do
    for j in 3 4 # loop on the two subdirs
    do
    result[$j]=$(tac $dir/af$j/results.stdout | awk '
    /TACOMA:- Normal termination: iterations complete!/ {success = 1; exit}
    END { if (success == 1)
              print "Success"
          else
              print "Failure"
        }')
    done
done
exit 

However, I don't know how to write the summary file...I'd like to pass the result array to another awk program, but awk doesn't accept array variables. Any suggestions? Feel free to change the approach or even the tools, if you think my programming style, tools choice or both suck :)

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First, don't use tac, because there's no benefit in reversing the whole file. Just give the files to awk.

You can omit the second for loop and save the two results and print them afterwards:

for dir in ??? # loop on all the directories
do
    for j in 3 4; do
        af[$j]=$(awk '/TACOMA:- Normal termination: iterations complete!/ {success = 1; exit}
                   END { if (success == 1)
                             print "Success"
                         else
                             print "Failure"
                   }'  $dir/af$j/results.stdout)
     done

     awk -v format="$format0" "BEGIN { printf format, \"$dir\", \"${af[3]}\", \"${af[4]}\"; } " >> summary
done

From @EdMorton in bash only without awk:

for dir in ??? # loop on all the directories
do
    for j in 3 4; do
        if grep -q "TACOMA:- Normal termination: iterations complete!" "$dir/af$j/results.stdout"; then
            af[$j]="Success"
        else
            af[$j]="Failure"
        fi
     done

     printf "$format0" "$dir" "${af[3]}" "${af[4]}" >> summary
done
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, @Olaf, I like your suggestion, but I need the loop on j for another task executed by the script. Is it possible to fix my code while keeping the loop? Also, I'm impressed by the fact that your code works, even if in the last call to awk you don't pass dir, af3 and af4 by the -v option. Why? I thought that was not possible....ps I use tac because the results.stdout files are huge, and the string TACOMA:- Normal termination: iterations complete!, if present, is at the end of the file. That way, I reduce considerably the cpu time. –  DeltaIV Oct 22 '12 at 17:13
1  
Do NOT use double quotes to enclose your awk scripts that way as it can lead to bizarre results depending on your variable values and requires otherwise unnecessary escaping of various characters. In the above script you don't need awk at all for that last line, just use bash's printf with the same args. You don't need awk for the other parts either, a simple grep and test for $? would suffice. If you're going to loop on the files in shell as bove, stick to shell, but the more natural approach is to pass the list of files to awk. –  Ed Morton Oct 22 '12 at 18:07
    
Look at the edited version. It should do with the inner loop. @EdMorton is correct in that double quotes complicate matters. Although, in this case it allows to insert the variables into the awk script. He is also correct, that you can do it in several different ways. It surely is good advice to learn shell scripting, as well as all the tools unix provides. –  Olaf Dietsche Oct 22 '12 at 18:14
1  
@OlafDietsche but using awk for that is adding no value, just making the code slower and more complex. All you need is bash: printf "$format0" "$dir" "${af[3]}" "${af[4]}" –  Ed Morton Oct 22 '12 at 18:33
1  
@OlafDietsche I updated your answer to show what I mean, hope that's OK. If not, my apologies and feel free to delete what I added. –  Ed Morton Oct 22 '12 at 18:41

I would just printf the results while looping:

printf 'Massflow        af3      af4\n'
for dir in $(find -maxdepth 1 -type d) # loop on all the directories
do
    printf '     %d  ' "$(printf '%s' "$dir" | sed -e 's/[^0-9]//g')"
    for j in 3 4 # loop on the two subdirs
    do
    result[$j]=$(tac $dir/af$j/tacoma.stdout | awk '
    /TACOMA:- Normal termination: iterations complete!/ {success = 1; exit}
    END { if (success == 1)
              print "Success"
          else
              print "Failure"
        }')
        printf '  %s' "$result[j]"
    done
    printf '\n'
done
share|improve this answer
    
Hi @Janito, this is interesting but I don't understand the command in line 4. Could you please explain? –  DeltaIV Oct 22 '12 at 17:15
    
Sure! We tell printf to print a digit (%d) surrounded by an appropriate number of spaces. After that, we need to pass the digit, which must be extracted from the $dir variable. To extract it, we use an in-place command $() that uses printf to print the contents of $dir as a string (%s) into the sed command, which will replace any characters that aren't digits [^0-9] with nothing. Therefore, the results of the in-place command is the digits present in the contents of $dir. If further clarification is needed, don't hesitate to ask =) –  Janito Vaqueiro Ferreira Filho Oct 22 '12 at 17:19
1  
If you just want to get rid of the digits from dir, all you need to do is "${dir//[^0-9]}", you don't need all the code in the "$(...)". –  Ed Morton Oct 25 '12 at 12:47

Here's a different way to look at the problem: use grep instead of awk, and use column to format the output.

isSuccess() {
    if tac "$1" | grep -q 'Normal termination: iterations complete'; then
        echo Success
    else
        echo Failure
    fi
}

{
    echo Massflow af3 af4
    for dir in ???; do
        echo "$dir" $(isSuccess "$dir/af3/results.stdout") $(isSuccess "$dir/af4/results.stdout")
    done
} | column -t
share|improve this answer

Build up your list of output files using find or a loop or whatever you like first and then pass the whole list to awk, e.g.

for dirName in ???
do
   for subName in af3 af4
   do
      files="$files $dirName/$subName/results.stdout"
   done
done

awk '
FNR == 1 {
   split(FILENAME,dfA,"/")
   dirName = dfA[1]
   subName = dfA[2]
   dirNames[dirName]
   subNames[subName]
}

/Normal termination: iterations complete!/ {
   succ[dirName,subName]
}

END {
   printf "Massflow"
   for (subName in subNames) {
      printf "\t%s",subName
   }
   print ""

   for (dirName in dirNames) {
      printf "%s", dirName
      for (subName in subNames) {
         printf "\t%s", ( (dirName,subName) in succ ? "Success" : "Failure" )
      }
      print ""
   }
}
' $files

Note that I did not quote $files at the end so it would expand correctly for your example. I just edited my answer as I see the directory structure is dir/subdir/results.stdout rather than dir/file as I first thought.

Commented version per @DeltaIV's resuest

for dirName in ???
do
   for subName in af3 af4
   do
      files="$files $dirName/$subName/results.stdout"
   done
done

awk '
# FNR == 1 is true at the first line of each input file
FNR == 1 {

   split(FILENAME,dfA,"/")
   dirName = dfA[1]
   subName = dfA[2]

   # Use array dirNames as the set of all top level directory names
   # and array subNames as the set of all sub-directory names so later
   # we can loop through them all to produce output.
   dirNames[dirName]
   subNames[subName]
}

# Check if the current line of the current input file contains the
# success indication text.
/Normal termination: iterations complete!/ {

   # The success indication text was found in the current file so
   # updated array succ which is the set of all dirName/SubName
   # pairs that had the success indication in their results file.
   succ[dirName,subName]
}

# "END" is true after all input files have been processed.
END {

   # Print the header line consisting of Massflow followed by the
   # sub-directory names
   printf "Massflow"
   for (subName in subNames) {
      printf "\t%s",subName
   }
   print ""

   # Loop through the set of dirNames so you get one per row
   # and for each dirName process all sub-directory names
   for (dirName in dirNames) {
      printf "%s", dirName
      # Loop through the set of subNames and process each one
      # as a new tab-separated column of output
      for (subName in subNames) {
         # If the current dirName/subName combination is in the succ
         # set then print "Success", otherwise print "Failure".
         printf "\t%s", ( (dirName,subName) in succ ? "Success" : "Failure" )
      }
      # Move down to the next row of output.
      print ""
   }
}
' $files
share|improve this answer
    
now I understand at least the first loop :) I also found out that FNR is the number of records of the current file, and that split will split the FILENAME of the current file in the array dfA according to delimeter /. I'd really need line-by-line help to understand the rest, though. Can I ask for such detailed help here, or should I send you a private email? –  DeltaIV Oct 23 '12 at 8:35
    
@DeltaIV: I updated my answer with a commented version of the script. Feel free to ask questions. –  Ed Morton Oct 23 '12 at 12:51
    
my compliments. You wrote such a flexible code in such a short time: wish I could do the same...Q: Lines 20-21: what does the syntax subNames[subName] mean? Is it some shorthand for subNames[i]=subName? So succ[dirName,subName] would be succ[i] = (dirName subName). Line 54: what's this? ( (dirName,subName) in succ ? "Success" : "Failure" ). Finally, why tabs instead than a format string? Isn't there the risk of messing the output, if in future I need to add more/longer stuff? –  DeltaIV Oct 24 '12 at 12:28
    
Line 20-21: subNames[subName] is shorthand for subNames[subName] = "". It just adds the current value of the variable subName to the list of indices for the array subNames. Line 54: That just tests if the current dirName,subName pair is a previously populated index for the 2-D array "succ". Think of dirNames, subNames, and succ as sets. As for formatting - I'm lazy and figured you could format the output however you like given the algorithm. –  Ed Morton Oct 24 '12 at 15:12
    
I tried your script and it fails on the last file: awk: cmd. line:46: (FILENAME=139/af4/results.stdout FNR=35564) fatal: not enough arguments to satisfy format string %sFailure'. ^ ran out for this one` Any pointers to the reason why? PS the content of the summary file is Massflow af3 af4 075 –  DeltaIV Oct 25 '12 at 7:22

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