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So I'm trying to parse raw strings into a list (many actually) so let's say I have:

|[nothing detected] www.neopets.com/
        |status: (referer=http://www.google.com)saved 55189 bytes /fetch_d4cd213a56276ca726ddd437a1e75f1024ab7799
        |file: fetch_d4cd213a56276ca726ddd437a1e75f1024ab7799: 55189 bytes
        |file: decoding_367af53b4963986ecdeb9c09ce1a405b5b1ecd91: 68 bytes
        |[nothing detected] (script) images.neopets.com/js/common.js?v=6
            |status: (referer=http://www.google.com)saved 1523 bytes /fetch_8eeadcc08d4cb48c02dedf18648510b75190d1d7failure: [Errno 13] Permission denied: '/tmp/tmpsha1_8d7fb3ff1ef087c7ea2bf044dee294735a76ed4b.js'
            |file: fetch_8eeadcc08d4cb48c02dedf18648510b75190d1d7: 1523 bytes

And it follows a similar pattern so on and so forth. Let's assume the depth of tabs is at most 3. I'm trying to find a way to parse this into each sublist, so in this particular case it would be a list containing the first 'nothing detected' followed by a list containing status, file, file, and a list containing the next nothing detected along its status/file result. (I know my wording isn't the best, sorry). Thanks!

So far, I've tried counting the '\t' in each line, and iterating through the whole thing, but I'm pretty confused since I can't go back in my iteration.

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if the elements that spawn new sublists are the only ones that start with a tag enclosed into a pair of square brackets, you can think of parse them –  Marco L. Oct 22 '12 at 13:02
    
Observation: your format looks similar to YAML. –  Chris Morgan Oct 22 '12 at 13:03
    
Recursive generators might be a fun way to accomplish this. [Example code in a bit.] –  Jon Gauthier Oct 22 '12 at 13:05
    
Initially I tried recursion, but my coding skills aren't that well and I got a lot of logical errors t.t –  Stupid.Fat.Cat Oct 22 '12 at 13:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you want a data structure which can be traversed each way -- i.e. a list which knows about the list that contains it -- Here's my attempt:

s = """|[nothing detected] www.neopets.com/
\t|status: (referer=http://www.google.com)saved 55189 bytes /fetch_d4cd213a56276ca726ddd437a1e75f1024ab7799
\t\t|file: fetch_d4cd213a56276ca726ddd437a1e75f1024ab7799: 55189 bytes
\t\t|file: decoding_367af53b4963986ecdeb9c09ce1a405b5b1ecd91: 68 bytes
\t\t|[nothing detected] (script) images.neopets.com/js/common.js?v=6
\t\t\t|status: (referer=http://www.google.com)saved 1523 bytes /fetch_8eeadcc08d4cb48c02dedf18648510b75190d1d7failure: [Errno 13] Permission denied: '/tmp/tmpsha1_8d7fb3ff1ef087c7ea2bf044dee294735a76ed4b.js'
\t\t|file: fetch_8eeadcc08d4cb48c02dedf18648510b75190d1d7: 1523 bytes""".splitlines()

class MyList(list):
    def __init__(self, parent):
        self.parent = parent
        list.__init__(self)

top = current = MyList(None)
ntab_old = 0
for line in s:
    ntab = line.count('\t') #may need to be more robust to get tabs only at beginning
    if(ntab_old > ntab):
        #go up ntab_old - ntab levels.
        for _ in range(ntab_old - ntab):
            current = current.parent
    elif(ntab_old < ntab):
        #increased indentation means we want a new list
        current.append(MyList(current))
        current = current[-1]
    current.append(line)
    ntab_old = ntab

print top
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I'm going to read through it and try it out –  Stupid.Fat.Cat Oct 22 '12 at 13:13
    
@SOCommunity -- if you have a better name for the MyList class, feel free to edit. I'm not feeling particularly creative today ... –  mgilson Oct 22 '12 at 13:18
    
You are absolutely amazing :| this worked as intended, still taking some time figuring out what's going on, but a million thanks! –  Stupid.Fat.Cat Oct 22 '12 at 13:22
    
@Shelby.S -- Basically I keep a reference to the current list we're working on. If the indentation changes, then I change which list current references (if indentation increases, I add a create a new list and point current at the new list -- if it decreases, I look up the parent "tree" until I find the right one to point current at). Then I add the line to whatever list current references. –  mgilson Oct 22 '12 at 13:28

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