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How can I remove the __size attribute in this object ?

class Object():
    def __init__(self, size):
        self.__size = size

    def __len__(self):
        return self.__size

How can the init function create the len function ? Lambda function ?

PS: In my real case, I have some calculations to do in this len function, but after instantiation the result is always the same (like a tuple for instance). It might be great to save this result in a function without any hidden attribute.

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1  
Can you be a little more specific? pseudo-private attributes tend to be the best way to memoize data in an object, but your question is a bit vague to give any better suggestions for. –  Silas Ray Oct 22 '12 at 13:11
4  
as it is now, nothing is wrong, I would call the member _size though. Explicit is better than implicit. –  dav1d Oct 22 '12 at 13:12
1  
In short: You should not struggle for removing that attribute. It is better this way. –  jsbueno Oct 22 '12 at 15:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would not recommend this, but you can use a simple lambda function

class Object():
    def __init__(self, size):
        self.__len__ = lambda: size


>>> len(Object(3))
3

The reasons why I would not recommend this are subsummed in the Zen of Python: Explicit is better than implicit. Simple is better than complex.

If you are using an instance variable, then it is explicit, you have better stacktraces for errors, you can use doctests in you __len__ function and the code is easier to understand when reading and updating it.

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1  
It introduces overhead without adding functionality in 99.9% of cases. –  Silas Ray Oct 22 '12 at 13:12
1  
@recursive Explicit is better than implicit. Simple is better than complex. If you are using an instance variable, then it is explicit, you have better stacktraces for errors, you can use doctests in you len function and the code is easier to understand when reading and updating it. –  nd. Oct 22 '12 at 13:14
3  
This does not work for Python 3.x. Gives error TypeError: object of type 'Object' has no len() see ideone.com/ugAT8k –  halex Oct 22 '12 at 13:25
2  
Nor does it for 2.x in new-style classes. –  glglgl Oct 22 '12 at 13:29
1  
Does it have to be lambda self: size instead? Think most code expects len to be an instance method. –  Silas Ray Oct 22 '12 at 13:30

As it is not possible to let __len__ be a instance attribute in order to be used via len(), you must define it in the class. But as there is no restriction otherwise, you could define an instance attribute __len__ so that your namespace isn't polluted.

class MyObject(object):
    def __init__(self, size):
        self.__len__ = lambda: size
    def __len__(self):
        return self.__len__()

This looks confusing (and because of this is probably froned upon), but it works.

It works because the class attribute __len__(), being the def-ed function, calls the instance attribute __len__(), which is the lambda from __init__().

Having shown what is possible, I wouldn't recommend it, because it can be very confusing.

Your original solution is much better.

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