Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm currently using Java to access a .sql file (called patient.sql). Running queries and updating the table works well while the program is running, but the changes aren't made on disk.

So, for example, I have a 30 node database with some fields including caseID (primary key) and Hospital. I want to change the Hospital of the node with caseID = Case29. To do this, I use the following code:

        // Prepare a statement to update a record
        String sql = "UPDATE patient SET Hospital='CX' WHERE caseID = 'Case29'";

        // Execute the insert statement
        stmt.executeUpdate(sql);

I have checked this and seen that it works (using a quick System.out.println()). However, when I finish the program and open the patient.sql, my change has not been registered. How can I save this change made?

Cheers

EDIT: I'm using HSQLDB

share|improve this question
3  
You need to commit your transaction as it looks like. This might help : mkyong.com/jdbc/jdbc-transaction-example –  TJ- Oct 22 '12 at 13:17
1  
How are you checking the result with println - what is the sql query you are doing there. Also what RDBMS are you using as these have different transaction management –  Mark Oct 22 '12 at 13:23
    
You should at least tell us the name of the DBMS you are using. HSQLDB, or whatever? –  Hakan Serce Oct 22 '12 at 13:32
    
What is the connection url you use to connect to the database? –  rudolfson Feb 1 '13 at 11:17

1 Answer 1

If you are using HSQLDB changes are stored in a .log file until SHUTDOWN is called. After a SHUTDOWN, all changes are moved to a .script file.

One description of HSQLDB files here:

http://hsqldb.org/doc/guide/ch01.html

In your case I suspect no SHUTDOWN has been called.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.