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In reading in Chapter 14 of Jon Bentley's "Programming Pearls", 2nd Edition, I understand that heaps use a one-based array and the easiest approach in C is to declare x[n+1] and waste element x[0] (page 148).

On page 157, Jon listed the complete heapsort pseudo code:

for i = [2, n]
    siftup(i)
for (i = n; i >= 2; i--)
    swap(1, i)
    siftdown(i - 1)

Here is an implementation in C. However, the array index starts with 0, instead of 1.

void heapSort(int numbers[], int array_size)
{
  int i, temp;

  // Qiang: shouldn't the stop-condition be i >= 1?
  for (i = (array_size / 2)-1; i >= 0; i--)
    siftDown(numbers, i, array_size);

  for (i = array_size-1; i >= 1; i--)
  {
    // Qiang: shouldn't the swap be done with numbmers[1], instead of numbers[0]?
    temp = numbers[0];
    numbers[0] = numbers[i];
    numbers[i] = temp;
    siftDown(numbers, 0, i-1);
  }
}

void siftDown(int numbers[], int root, int bottom)
{
  int done, maxChild, temp;

  done = 0;
  while ((root*2 <= bottom) && (!done))
  {
    if (root*2 == bottom)
      maxChild = root * 2;
    else if (numbers[root * 2] > numbers[root * 2 + 1])
      maxChild = root * 2;
    else
      maxChild = root * 2 + 1;

    if (numbers[root] < numbers[maxChild])
    {
      temp = numbers[root];
      numbers[root] = numbers[maxChild];
      numbers[maxChild] = temp;
      root = maxChild;
    }
    else
      done = 1;
  }
}

My worry is, if the array starts with index 0, then the following properties will not hold (as written on page 148 in Jon's book):

leftchild(i) = 2*i
rightchild(i) = 2*i+1
parent(i) = i/2

It looks to me that the properties here only hold when the i starts with 1.

What strikes me is that the analysis part in the implementation used an array starting with index 1, while the implementation part used an array starting with index 0 and didn't waste the first element.

Am I missing anything here?

Edited With help from interjay, I realized the error contained in the original implementation, which could be shown with a testing input array of {66,4,23,4,78,6,44,11,22,1,99}.

Changed the original siftDown() function a little bit to adjust the relationship between the index of parent and those of its children:

void siftDown(int numbers[], int root, int bottom)
{
  int done, maxChild, temp;

  done = 0;
  while ((root*2 + 1 <= bottom) && (!done))
  {
    if (root*2 + 1 == bottom ||
        numbers[root * 2 + 1] > numbers[root * 2 + 2])
      maxChild = root * 2 + 1;
    else
      maxChild = root * 2 + 2;

    if (numbers[root] < numbers[maxChild])
    {
      temp = numbers[root];
      numbers[root] = numbers[maxChild];
      numbers[maxChild] = temp;
      root = maxChild;
    }
    else
      done = 1;
  }
}

Credits go to interjay, :-)

Afterword: It looks the same error doesn't appear in the implementations in wikibooks and algorithmist. Hooray!

share|improve this question
    
I understand that heaps use a one-based array what makes you think this has to be the case? –  Mike Oct 22 '12 at 13:27
    
@Mike: Look at Chapter 14 of Jon Bentley's "Programming Pearls", esp. page 148. –  Qiang Xu Oct 22 '12 at 13:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The heap elements can be stored starting with index 0 or index 1, the decision on which to use is up to you.

If the root element is at index 1, the mathematical relations between parent and child indices are simple as you've shown above, and for that reason many books choose to teach it that way.

If the root is at index 0, you'd get these relations instead:

leftchild(i) = 2*i+1
rightchild(i) = 2*i+2
parent(i) = (i-1) / 2

It doesn't matter which one you pick as long as you are consistent.

The C code you've shown seems incorrect to me. It starts with array index 0, but uses the parent/child relations appropriate for starting with index 1.

share|improve this answer
    
Your analysis is the same as I have thought. But, when I tried to run the above implementation on a random testing array, it could be sorted without any glitch. This bewildered me. –  Qiang Xu Oct 22 '12 at 13:37
3  
@QiangXu: Here's an example of it failing. –  interjay Oct 22 '12 at 13:43
    
Thanks a lot, interjay. Just wondering how you found this critical test case? I used the original implementation to test over three or four randomly generated array, they all passed, :( –  Qiang Xu Oct 22 '12 at 13:54
    
@QiangXu: I just pressed some random keys on the keyboard, I guess I was lucky :) –  interjay Oct 22 '12 at 13:57
    
Weiss' Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in C++ (3rd edition) also uses the index 1 approach. My only worry with using the 0 as the root index was that floor_function(i/2) was not going to work, but I can see the use of floor_function([i - 1]) /2) working to alleviate this problem. It's seems silly to waste the 0 index for such a small reason. –  Derek W Nov 23 '12 at 19:49

A reusable implementation of heapsort would want to start at a root index of 0 so the user could use a normal (0 based) array with it. You wouldn't want to require the user to allocate an extra member and start the array at index 1 just so they can use your heapsort function. You do need to use the modified parent/child calculations that @interjay shows.

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Replying to little old thread, thought my small contribution might helps future visitors.

Experts please validate and correct my logic if I missed any scenarios.

Considered Qiang Xu link and interjay zero based index logic. And here is the C# code and tested with the below inputs.

//-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

// Input Arrays :

int[] ErrCaseArry = new int[] { 66, 4, 23, 4, 78, 6, 44, 11, 22, 1, 99}; 
int[] GenCaseArry = new int[] { 30, 20, 40, 10, 90, 160, 140, 100, 80, 70 };

int[] NearlySortedArry  = new int[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 5 };
int[] FewSortedArry1 = new int[] { 3, 2, 1, 4, 5, 6 }; 
int[] FewSortedArry2 = new int[] { 6, 2, 3, 1, 5, 4 };

int[] ReversedArry1  = new int[] { 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 }; 
int[] FewDuplsArry2  = new int[] { 1, 3, 1, 2, 1, 3 }; 
int[] MoreDuplsArry3 = new int[] { 1, 1, 2, 2, 1, 2 };

//-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

public void HeapSort(int[] listToSort)
{
    int LastChildIndex = listToSort.Length -1;
    int parentElementIndex = ((LastChildIndex - 1)/ 2);

    //1. Use this loop to Construct Heap Array (Max/Min) by using Heapify function on every node.
    while (parentElementIndex >= 0)                                        //  (N - 1) / 2  to 0
    {
        Heapify(listToSort, parentElementIndex, LastChildIndex);           //  (N - 1) / 2  & Lenght - 1

        parentElementIndex--;
    }

    //-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    AppendArrayToResultString("Max Heap\t", listToSort);

    //2. Heap sort algorithm takes largest element off the heap and places it at the end of an array.
    //   This phase continue until all the elements are placed in the array that are in sorted order.
    int sortedElementIndex = listToSort.Length - 1;

    //-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    // In this loop get Largest Element to Zero'th postion and move to end. and reduce the loop count from Heapify Array. So that elements gets sorted from right.

    while (sortedElementIndex >= 0)                                       //  (N - 1) to 1
    {
        // Swap the elements (root(maximum value)) of the heap with the last element of the heap
        Swap(ref listToSort[0], ref listToSort[sortedElementIndex]);

        // sortedElementIndex-- : Decrease the size of the heap by one so that the previous max value will stay in its proper placement
        sortedElementIndex--;

        if (sortedElementIndex == -1) break;

        // Since largest elemented from 0 to last, Re Heapify and get the remaining largest element and place it in 0 position.
        Heapify(listToSort, 0, (sortedElementIndex));                 //  0 to (N - 1) 
    }

    //-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}

//Heapify() function maintain the heap property (Max Heap or Min Heap). Can be recursive or can use iteration loop like while/for.
void Heapify(int[] listToSort, int parentIndext, int lastChildIndext)
{
    //bool doneFlag = false;

    int largestElementIndex = 0;
    int leftChildIndex = parentIndext * 2 + 1;
    int rightChildIndex = parentIndext * 2 + 2;

    while (leftChildIndex <= lastChildIndext) //&& !doneFlag)
    {
        // If leftChild is larger than rightChild or it is the last child and there is no rightChild for this parent. 
        // Then consider leftChild as largestElement else consider rightChild as largestElement.
        if (leftChildIndex == lastChildIndext || listToSort[leftChildIndex] > listToSort[rightChildIndex]) 
        {
            largestElementIndex = leftChildIndex;
        }
        else
        {
            largestElementIndex = rightChildIndex;
        }

        //-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        // If largestElement is larger than parent then swap them and make parent as largestElement to continue the loop.

        if (listToSort[parentIndext] < listToSort[largestElementIndex])
        {
            // Make largestElement as parent. And continue finding if childs (left and right) are bigger than element in largestIndex position.
            Swap(ref listToSort[parentIndext], ref listToSort[largestElementIndex]);

            // Repeat to continue sifting down the child now
            parentIndext = largestElementIndex;
            leftChildIndex = ((parentIndext * 2) + 1);
            rightChildIndex = ((parentIndext * 2) + 2);
        }
        else
        {
            //doneFlag = true; 
            break;  // Trying to avoid extra flag condition check. Or return.
        }
    }
}

//-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

void Swap(ref int num1, ref int num2)
{
    int temp = num1;

    num1 = num2;
    num2 = temp;
}
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