Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let us consider we have an api for zoos such that ../api/zoos which goes all the way to accessing individual animals in a given zoo such as ../api/zoos/123/elephants/234 i.e there are well defined apis for each animal type.
    Now if we want to query at the super type ( abstract class Animal where class Elephant extends Animal) , is exposing an api of the sort ../api/zoos/123/animals?type="mammal"&legs=4 for such meta-queries a good idea ?
    What makes me think twice about such an approach is while super-type api is practically useful for metaqueries across the concrete types but this essentially is a read-only query, also from the extensibility point of view say between the super type Animal and concrete type Elephant there can be many other types like Mammal, FourLegged etc. which can be individually queried then a call needs to be taken on whether or not read-only apis needs to be exposed on these as well or we have a type parameter on animal query that does the job. Please suggest.

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Do you have seperate IDs for each species of animal?
I mean, is there an Elephant ID=4 and a Tiger ID=4?

If not, I would structure this as /zoos/123/animals/234

You could then do /zoos/123/animals?species=elephant to list all elephants, and get back an array of links with IDs that might look somewhat random: { /zoos/123/animals/5, /zoos/123/animals/19, /zoos/123/animals/34, /zoos/123/animals/35, /zoos/123/animals/72 }

If you do have conflicting IDs across species, then I would suggest creating a new resource mapping of Animal IDs to Species IDs:

+----------------------------+
|animal_id|species|species_id|
+----------------------------+
|       1 |  duck |        1 |  => the first duck is /animals/1
|       2 |  frog |        1 |  => the first frog is /animals/2
+----------------------------+

Then you can still use the URL structure /zoos/123/animals/234. You would have no need to refer to the frog as /frogs/1 as a page such as /animals?order=anura&page=1&limit=10 would have given you a link directly to /animals/2

In summary, IDs belong in your superclass

share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot for ur answer, I see the point you are making here. But what i am thinking here is having api s only for the superclass probably compromises a little on the readability aspect, i mean /zoos/123/frogs/2 wud be a little more readable than /zoos/123/animals/2 and similarily if there are more fine-grained pieces of info for a particular animal type, with /animals we really have a big canvas to chose from –  redzedi Nov 30 '12 at 17:19
1  
It may be a little more readable, but that shouldn't matter too much, and causes much bigger problems as you have outlined in your question. Just remember that most humans don't read the address bar, they just click links. Make the link text say whatever you want to. Machines of course can't read at all, the URL to them is just a bunch of ones and zeros. –  Nicholas Nov 30 '12 at 22:30
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.