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If I have

abstract class Base<TSub>
{
    protected static List<TSub> MyStaticList;
}

class DerivedA : Base<DerivedA>
{
}

class DerivedB : Base<DerivedB>
{

}

I get two independent MyStaticList variables, one for each base class. If instead the base looked like this

class Base<TSub>
{
    protected static List<string> MyStaticList;
}

i.e., the template parameter was nowhere used, am I guaranteed to still get two independent MyStaticList variables?

(I need this for the availableValues() method of a customized Enum-like class hierarchy.)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/gusperez/archive/2005/08/09/449363.aspx

A static variable in a generic class declaration is shared amongst all instances of the same closed constructed type (§26.5.2), but is not shared amongst instances of different closed constructed types. These rules apply regardless of whether the type of the static variable involves any type parameters or not.

EDIT A very similar question was asked before Generic List and static variable behaviour in c#

You'll have to go with a fully static construct to use inside of your generic classes. Maybe something like...

protected static List<TSub> MyStaticList = BaseUtil.MyStaticList
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even if the type parameter is not used at all? So I could use an "unused" type parameter just to force a separate MyStaticList to be created? –  B3ret Oct 22 '12 at 13:37
1  
@B3ret Absolutely, you can. Even if the type is not used, you get a different class incompatible with the one created using a different set of type parameters. –  dasblinkenlight Oct 22 '12 at 13:46

Two instantiations of a generic class with different type parameters will result in two independent classes, each with its own set of static variables. So the answer is yes, the static variables Base<ClassA>.MyStaticList and Base<ClassB>.MyStaticList will be independent.

If you would like an opposite behavior (i.e. all generic classes sharing the same static variable) move the variable declaration into a non-generic class, and make it the base class of your generic, like this:

public class BaseOfGeneric {
    protected static List<string> MyStaticList;
}
abstract class Base<TSub> : BaseOfGeneric 
{
    ...
}

Now all instances of Base<T> will share the same MyStaticList, regardless of their type parameters.

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