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I'm developing a WPF XBAP application that provides API to user through JavaScript by using BrowserInteropHelper. After rewriting managed part in new async-await fashion there is a need to wait until async operation is finished without making calling method async Task itself. I have :

public string SyncMethod(object parameter)
{
    var sender = CurrentPage as MainView; // interop
    var result = string.Empty;
    if (sender != null)
    sender.Dispatcher.Invoke(DispatcherPriority.Normal,
                                 new Action(async () =>
                                                {
                                                    try
                                                    {
                                                        result = await sender.AsyncMethod(parameter.ToString());
                                                    }
                                                    catch (Exception exception)
                                                    {
                                                        result = exception.Message;
                                                    }
                                                }));
    return result;        
}

This method returns string.Empty because that happens right after execution. I've tried to assign this action to DispatcherOperation and do while(dispatcherOperation.Status != Completed) { Wait(); }, but even after execution the value is still empty. dispatcherOperation.Task.Wait() or dispatcherOperation.Task.ContinueWith() also didn't help.
edit
Also tried

var op = sender.Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(...);
op.Completed += (s, e) => { var t = result; };

But t is empty too because assignment happens before awaiting of asynchronous method.
edit
Long story short, SyncMethod JavaScript interop handler helper wrapper, and all operations it runs must be on Dispatcher. AsyncMethod is async Task< T > and works perfectly when executed and awaited from inside application, i.e. inside some button handler. It has a lot of UI-dependent logic (showing status progressbar, changing cursor, etc.).
edit
AsyncMethod :

public async Task<string> AsyncMethod(string input)
{
    UIHelpers.SetBusyState(); // overriding mouse cursor via Application.Current.Dispatcher
    ProgressText = string.Empty; // viewmodel property reflected in ui
    var tasksInputData = ParseInput(input);    
    var tasksList = new List<Task>();
    foreach (var taskInputDataObject in tasksInputData)
    {
        var currentTask = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {            
            using (var a = new AutoBusyHandler("Running operation" + taskInputData.OperationName))
            { // setting busy property true/false via Application.Current.Dispatcher
                var databaseOperationResult = DAL.SomeLongRunningMethod(taskInputDataObject);
                ProgressText += databaseOperationResult;
            }
        });
        tasksList.Add(insertCurrentRecordTask);
    }    
    var allTasksFinished = Task.Factory.ContinueWhenAll(tasksList.ToArray(), (list) =>
    {        
        return ProgressText;
    });
    return await allTasksFinished;    
}
share|improve this question
    
What's the point of using Dispatcher.Invoke here? You're not touching a UI element... –  Servy Oct 22 '12 at 13:51
    
See second edit. –  Jaded Oct 22 '12 at 14:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

After rewriting managed part in new async-await fashion there is a need to wait until async operation is finished without making calling method async Task itself.

This is one of the most difficult things you can try to do.

AsyncMethod is async Task< T > and works perfectly when executed and awaited from inside application, i.e. inside some button handler. It has a lot of UI-dependent logic

And this situation makes it near-impossible.


The problem is that you need to block SyncMethod which is running on the UI thread, while allowing AsyncMethod to dispatch to the UI message queue.

There are a couple of approaches you could take:

  1. Block on the Task using Wait or Result. You can avoid the deadlock problem described on my blog by using ConfigureAwait(false) in AsyncMethod. This means AsyncMethod will have to be refactored to replace UI-dependent logic with IProgress<T> or other nonblocking callbacks.
  2. Install a nested message loop. This should work but you'll have to think through all the re-entrancy ramifications.

Personally, I think (1) is cleaner.

share|improve this answer
    
Was just about to re-write my answer to say something like this, based on OP's comments, although I didn't think of option #2. –  Servy Oct 22 '12 at 15:01
    
Tried ConfigureAwait(false), didn't have any effect. Blocking via Result worked, but UI updates ( BusyIndicator actually - using same approach as described here - adamsteinert.com/blog/2011/10/busy-indicators-and-many-threads ) now doesn't happen. Now looking for solution of this problem. Thanks for blog link, gonna dig deeper. –  Jaded Oct 23 '12 at 9:28
    
Is your AsyncMethod actually asynchronous? The only reason ConfigureAwait(false) would not have an effect is if all things awaited were already complete or synchronous. –  Stephen Cleary Oct 23 '12 at 11:11
    
AsyncMethod runs database operations (let's say multiple inserts) and returns newly inserted row ids (see third edit of first post). I tried to do ConfigureAwait(false) on all insert tasks plus last one that returns global result. –  Jaded Oct 23 '12 at 12:20

do this:

var are = new AutoResetEvent(true);
sender.Dispatcher.Invoke(DispatcherPriority.Normal,                                      
        new Action(async () =>
        {
           try { ... } catch { ... } finally { are.Set(); }
        }));



are.WaitOne();
return result;

are.WaitOne() will tell AutoResetEvent to wait until it is signaled which will happen when dispatcher action reaches finally block where are.Set() is called.

share|improve this answer
    
That's very much overthinking the problem. You don't need to go through so much effort to wait until a task has completed; it provides a method (two in fact) that do exactly that. –  Servy Oct 22 '12 at 13:56
    
AsyncMethod runs after WaitOne() successully, but blocks UI and never returns (only application closing, and returns empty). –  Jaded Oct 22 '12 at 14:45
    
my bad, it was supposed to be var are = new AutoResetEvent(true); -> true as a parameter, not false; I updated the code above. –  Jarek Kardas Oct 22 '12 at 14:59
    
Code have same result as original one. Thanks anyway. –  Jaded Oct 23 '12 at 8:13

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