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I realize there are heaps of questions out there about combinatorics and enumeration, but I've searched around and haven't found anything relating specifically to what I'm after. If I've missed something please point me to it and the question can be closed.

So, assume we have a set of N elements, and we have x positive integers k1,...,kx where Sum(k1,...,kx) <= N. I want to enumerate all the ways I can choose (without replacement) x subsets of the given sizes, from the original set of N.

I hope I've phrased that correctly. In case I haven't, a simple example.
N = 4, x = 2, k1 = 2, k2 = 1.

We should enumerate

  • {1, 2} {3}
  • {1, 2} {4}
  • {1, 3} {2}
  • {1, 3} {4}
  • {1, 4} {2}
  • {1, 4} {3}
  • {2, 3} {1}
  • {2, 3} {4}
  • {2, 4} {1}
  • {2, 4} {3}
  • {3, 4} {1}
  • {3, 4} {2}

In the general case, the total count would I think be:

C(N, k1) * C(N - k1, k2) * ... * C(N - Sum(k1,...,kn-1), kn).

My initial guess is that this could be done fairly easily using a stack. At each stack level i the subset ki would be generated using a standard combinations enumeration, either removing from the source set at each level those elements that have been chosen, or just enumerating from the original set and skipping cases where an element has been included before.

My question, is there a faster/more elegant solution?

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SOs format checker is ridiculous, I've just spent 45 minutes fighting with it to get it to accept my question because it told me my code wasn't formatted correctly. There is no code, and what I had initially was formatted fine in the preview. I was very close to just giving up. –  kamrann Oct 22 '12 at 13:56
    
I think you should do this with a recursive function that builds the first subset, then the second... –  alestanis Oct 22 '12 at 14:48
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your question is exactly the problem of enumerating permutations of a multiset. (Assuming that your ki are ordered).

First, note that the problem is exactly equivalent to the one where Σk = N, because if Σk < N, we can simply add kx+1 whose value is N - Σk.

Now, put elements of the original set S in some arbitrary fixed order, and generate each permutation of the multiset consisting of k1 1's, k2 2's, k3 3's, ... kx x's. This multiset has the same size (N) of S, because the ki's add up to N. We create the partition of S by assigning each element in S to the subset whose index is the corresponding value in the permutation of the multiset.

For example, S = {apple, banana, chirimoya, date} (N = 4). We take k1 = 2 and k2 = 1 and add k3 = 1 to bring the sum to 4. (We'll just ignore elements assigned to subset 3). Now we enumerate the permutations of the multiset 1 1 2 3 (which has two 1's, one 2, and one 3, corresponding to the k's):

1 1 2 3    1 2 3 1    2 1 1 3    3 1 1 2
1 1 3 2    1 3 1 2    2 1 3 1    3 1 2 1
1 2 1 3    1 3 1 1    2 3 1 1    3 2 1 1

We convert these back into partitions of S. For example, taking 1 3 1 2:

apple     1 -> subset 1
banana    3 -> unused
chirimoya 1 -> subset 1
date      2 -> subset 2

So we have {{apple, chirimoya}, {date}}

The standard algorithm for finding permutations of a set works just as well on a multiset, although it's not optimal if the multiset has a lot of duplicates.

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Thanks, looks like a very clean solution. –  kamrann Oct 27 '12 at 23:03
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