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I have Two models Department and Worker. Departments has to-many relationship(workers) to worker. Worker has firstName field. How can i get a worker list sorted by firstName by accessing departmet.workers? Is there any way to add sort descriptors in to-many relationship?

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Its an old thread .. But it worked and helped me big time ! Book-marking this thread Thanks all ..!! – Shailesh Aug 16 '13 at 7:33

Minor improvement over Adrian Hosey's code:

Instead of manually iterating over all workers you can also just do:

-(NSArray *)sortedWorkers {
  NSSortDescriptor *sortNameDescriptor = [[[NSSortDescriptor alloc] initWithKey:@"firstName" ascending:YES] autorelease];
  NSArray *sortDescriptors = [[[NSArray alloc] initWithObjects:sortNameDescriptor, nil] autorelease];

  return [self.workers sortedArrayUsingDescriptors:sortDescriptors];
}

Probably does exactly the same thing as your iteration internally, but maybe they made it more efficient somehow. It's certainly less typing…

Note: the above only works on iOS 4.0+ and OSX 10.6+. In older versions you need to replace the last line with:

  return [[self.workers allObjects] sortedArrayUsingDescriptors:sortDescriptors];
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Uhm, sorting is O(n*log(n)), iterating is O(n). While this is less code, it is certainly slower. – Steve Brewer Dec 29 '10 at 21:25
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While true, the difference between the code snippets isn't that one iterates and one sort. They are both using the sort method, it's just that Adrian is using the [allObjects] method to convert to an array rather than manually building one up by iterating over the set – Ryan French Oct 3 '11 at 21:17
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As of OS X 10.6 neither manual iteration, nor [allObjects] are necessary as NSSet itself implements sortedArrayUsingDescriptors:, sparing the superfluous creation of a temporary NSArray. – Regexident Jan 16 '12 at 14:10

To-many relationships in Core Data are modeled as unordered sets. However, you can create a fetched property on the Department entity that includes a sort descriptor or you can sort set in-memory within your application (NSArrayController will do this for you by setting its sortDescriptors property).

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I'd vote for a fetched property since it seems the "most natural way" in Core Data. – Karsten Silz Mar 12 '10 at 17:12
    
@BarryWark I agree with Karsten, but I think it would be better if you would include some details about how to create the descriptor. After a bit of google searching I still haven't found how to do a "sort" descriptor in a fetched property, only how to match type queries. – csga5000 Aug 21 '15 at 22:17
    
Please provide example – MobileMon Sep 25 '15 at 19:30

Minor improvement over Adrian Schönig's solution:

By now it's necessary to cast self.workers to NSSet*

-(NSArray *)sortedWorkers {
   NSSortDescriptor *sortNameDescriptor = [[[NSSortDescriptor alloc] initWithKey:@"firstName" ascending:YES] autorelease];
   NSArray *sortDescriptors = [[[NSArray alloc] initWithObjects:sortNameDescriptor, nil] autorelease];

   return [(NSSet*)self.workers sortedArrayUsingDescriptors:sortDescriptors];
 }
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Hunter's code snip almost worked for me, except since "workers" is an NSSet, I had to load it into an NSMutableArray first:

- (NSArray *)sortedWorkers {
    NSSortDescriptor *sortNameDescriptor = [[[NSSortDescriptor alloc] initWithKey:@"firstName" ascending:YES] autorelease];
    NSArray *sortDescriptors = [[[NSArray alloc] initWithObjects:sortNameDescriptor, nil] autorelease];

    NSMutableArray *sortThese = [NSMutableArray arrayWithCapacity:[self.workers count]];
    for (id worker in self.workers) {
        [sortThese addObject:worker];
    }

    return [sortThese sortedArrayUsingDescriptors:sortDescriptors];
}
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You need to define your own method, such as sortedWorkers. Something like this:

- (NSArray *)sortedWorkers {
    NSSortDescriptor *sortNameDescriptor = [[[NSSortDescriptor alloc] initWithKey:@"firstName" ascending:YES] autorelease];
    NSArray *sortDescriptors = [[[NSArray alloc] initWithObjects:sortNameDescriptor, nil] autorelease];

    return [self.workers sortedArrayUsingDescriptors:sortDescriptors];
}
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I notice that this is quite old, but people will still come across it (I did)

Adrian Schönig's post was good. I found it useful for the basics but you have to do this sort every time you want to access the Set of workers. This is very inefficient!

Instead what is better is to do the sort every time you insert a new object and then save that as the Set in CoreData. This means every time you call the CoreData the workers will be ordered.

I did this for my system using a Category for the NSManagedObject (Worker+Methods.h). In here I have the init method for a new Worker

// Worker+Methods.m
+(Worker *)newWorkerWithFirstname:(NSString *)firstName department:(Department *)department managedContext:(NSManagedObjectContext *)context {
    Worker *w = [NSEntityDescription insertNewObjectForEntityForName:@"Worker" inManagedObjectContext:context];
    w.firstName = firstName;
    w.department = department;

    [department orderWorkers];
    return s;
}


//Department+Methods.m
-(void)orderServices {
    NSSortDescriptor *sortNameDescriptor = [[[NSSortDescriptor alloc] initWithKey:@"firstName" ascending:YES] autorelease];
    self.workers = [[NSSet alloc] initWithArray:[self.workers sortedArrayUsingDescriptors:[NSArray arrayWithObject:sortNameDescriptor]]];
}

Obviously this is inefficient when you add lots of Workers, but you can just move [department orderWorkers]; to happen after all the workers are added.

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