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With XPath, I know that you can use the union operator in the following way:

//*[@id="Catalog"]/thead | //*[@id="Catalog"]/tbody

This seems to be a little awkward to me though. Is there a way to do something similar to one of these instead?

//*[@id="Catalog"]/(thead|tbody)
//*[@id="Catalog"]/(thead or tbody)
//*[@id="Catalog"]/*[nodename="thead" or nodename="tbody"]

That seems a lot more readable and intuitive to me...

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

While the expression:

//*[@id="Catalog"]/*[name()="thead" or name()="tbody"]

is correct

This expression is more efficient:

//*[@id="Catalog"]/*[self::thead or self::tbody]

There is yet a third way to check if the name of an element is one of a specified sequence of strings:

//*[@id="Catalog"]/*[contains(''|thead|tbody|',concat('|',name(),'|'))]

Using this last technique can be especially practical in case the mumber of possible names is very long (of unlimited and unknown length). The pipe-delimited string of possible names can even be passed as an external parameter to the transformation, which greatly increases its generality, reusability and "DRY"-ness.

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You are looking for the name() function:

//*[@id="Catalog"]/*[name()="thead" or name()="tbody"]
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I figured it out just before you posted your answer. =P Thanks for your help. –  Ajedi32 Oct 22 '12 at 14:49

Note that with XPath 2.0 your attempt //*[@id="Catalog"]/(thead|tbody) is correct. That approach does not work however with XPath 1.0.

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I figured it out; you do this by using the name() function (I was close):

//*[@id="Catalog"]/*[name()='thead' or name()='tbody']
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Yes you can use:

//*[@id="Catalog"]/[nodename='thead' or nodename='tbody']

EDIT:

Just re-read your original post and realised what you were asking. The above syntax wouldn't be correct for this situation. Not sure how to get the name of the node to use but nodename isn't right...

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You forget the star before '['. (I would just edit the post, but StackOverflow doesn't allow me to make edits less than 6 characters long.) –  Ajedi32 Oct 22 '12 at 14:39
    
Also, would you happen to know where this is documented? =) –  Ajedi32 Oct 22 '12 at 14:40
    
Sorry, yes that was a typo. You'll need a star (or other element name) there. –  Alan Buchanan Oct 22 '12 at 14:40
    
Just tried that query and it's not working as I would expect. I did manage to figure it out now though. Thanks for your help. –  Ajedi32 Oct 22 '12 at 14:46

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