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[Test]
public void testMultiplication()
{
    var five=new Dollar(5);
    Assert.AreEqual(new Dollar(10), five.times(2));
    Assert.AreEqual(new Dollar(15), five.times(3));
}

Dollar class

public class Dollar
{
    private int amount;

    public Dollar(int amount)
    {
        this.amount = amount;
    }

    public Dollar times(int multiplier)
    {
        return new Dollar(amount * multiplier);
    }

    public bool equals(Object theObject)
    {
       Dollar dollar = (Dollar) theObject;

       return amount == dollar.amount;
    }
}

On line Assert.AreEqual(new Dollar(10), five.times(2)); test fail with error:

Expected: TDDbooks.Dollar

But was: TDDbooks.Dollar

share|improve this question
    
aside: why don't you implement operator overloading? –  Daniel A. White Oct 22 '12 at 15:13
    
Looks like it could be an assembly versioning issue; is it possible that you have two versions of the assembly that implements TDDbooks.Dollar loaded? –  Dan Puzey Oct 22 '12 at 15:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

NUnit displays string representation of objects. In order to have handy output, you should override ToString method of Dollar class:

public override string ToString()
{
   return "$" + amount;
}

Now output will be like:

Expected: $10 
But was: $10

Next problem is dollars comparison. NUnit compare objects by calling Equals method (not equals, but Equals. Kent Beck uses Java in his examples. In C# we have Pascal naming for methods). Default implementation of Equals method return true if objects have same reference. But in Times method you create new instance of Dollar class. In order to fix that, you should change Equals method implementation to compare amount field.

public override bool Equals(object obj)
{ 
  Dollar other = obj as Dollar;
  if (other == null)
    return false;  

  return amount == other.amount;
}

Also notice, that you should use override keyword for overriding base class functionality. And one more thing - when you are overriding Equals functionality, you should override GetHashCode method. In your case it's OK to have something like:

public override int GetHashCode()
{
  return amount.GetHashCode();
}
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2  
Also, if you plan not to derive from the Dollar class, consider making it sealed. If you don't make it sealed, consider saying if (GetType() != other.GetType()) return false; inside the Equals method. Otherwise, you could get bad result if other is a Dollar of a more derived type, like a DescriptionDollar. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Oct 22 '12 at 15:44

The Assert.AreEquals method will use the Equals method to test equality. Instead of overriding Object.Equals the Dollar type just defines a new equals method that doesn't participate in .Net object equality. Hence it's not used and the test uses reference equality which fails. To fix this you need to override the Object.Equals method

public override bool Equals(object obj) { 
  Dollar other = obj as Dollar;
  if (other == null) {
    return false;
  }

  return amount == other.amount;
}
share|improve this answer

There's a couple things:

  1. You've defined a new method equals, instead of overriding the base class method Equals. Switch to overriding and NUnit will call your method.
  2. NUnit prints out the object using its ToString, and the default implementation of ToString is to simply print the class name. Override ToString to print the amount and the assertion message will make a lot more sense.
share|improve this answer

What you are asserting there is that new Dollar(10) is the same object as the one five.times(2) returns, which is not true.

If you want to assert in that way you'd need to overload the Equals method in your Dollar class like this:

 public override bool Equals(Object obj)
 {
     if (obj is Dollar)
     {
         return this.Amount == ((Dollar)obj).Amount;
     }
     return false;
 }

You are not using the override keyword in your Equals method.

share|improve this answer

The best solution has already been given by a few people, but there's an alternative that might work in other situations. You'd need to add a getter for the amount field like so:

public int Amount { get { return amount; } }

And then when you do the unit test, it would look like:

Assert.AreEqual(10, five.times(2).Amount);

So now you're comparing an int to another int. Alternatively you could make the amount variable public, though that breaks encapsulation. Obviously using the Equals method properly is the better way to go in this case, but in some situations, this might be preferable.

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