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I have a list of dictionaries, with keys 'a', 'n', 'o', 'u'. Is there a way to speed up this calculation, for instance with NumPy? There are tens of thousands of items in the list.

The data is drawn from a database, so I must live with that it's in the form of a list of dictionaries originally.

x = n = o = u = 0
for entry in indata:
    x += (entry['a']) * entry['n']  # n - number of data points
    n += entry['n']
    o += entry['o']
    u += entry['u']

    loops += 1

average = int(round(x / n)), n, o, u
share|improve this question
1  
What's the purpose of this code? What's the surrounding code? Context helps. – John Kugelman Oct 22 '12 at 15:17
    
@JohnKugelman, updated question slightly. – Prof. Falken Oct 22 '12 at 15:20
    
You might be able to optimize a bit with operator.itemgetter – mgilson Oct 22 '12 at 15:24
3  
Maybe your database can sum the values. – Jochen Ritzel Oct 22 '12 at 15:33
    
@mgilson, write up an example of how to do that and you have yourself an upvote. :) – Prof. Falken Oct 22 '12 at 15:45
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I doubt this will be much faster, but I suppose it's a candidate for timeit...

from operator import itemgetter
x = n = o = u = 0
items = itemgetter('a','n','o','u')
for entry in indata:
    A,N,O,U = items(entry)
    x += A*N  # n - number of data points
    n += N
    o += O    #don't know what you're doing with O or U, but I'll leave them
    u += U

average = int(round(x / n)), n, o, u

At the very least, it saves a lookup of entry['n'] since I've now saved it to a variable

share|improve this answer
    
The code unfolds as I watch. :-) – Prof. Falken Oct 22 '12 at 15:54
2  
@AmigableClarkKant -- I just thought it was cool when I could itemgetter multiple things from a dict at once. I've never done that before -- figured I'd share. At some point, maybe I'll do a quick timeit test to see how it performs ... – mgilson Oct 22 '12 at 15:56
    
What should be x += A*N? ---- O:^) ---- (updated) – mgilson Oct 22 '12 at 15:57
    
Yes. BTW, I profiled your code on my data, seems like about 10% faster. :-) – Prof. Falken Oct 22 '12 at 16:00
    
Looks prettier now I think, so I will use your version. A little faster AND prettier is a net win. – Prof. Falken Oct 22 '12 at 16:00

You could try something like this:


mean_a = np.sum(np.array([d['a'] for d in data]) * np.array([d['n'] for d in data])) / len(data)

EDIT: Actually, the method above from @mgilson is faster:


import numpy as np
from operator import itemgetter
from pandas import *

data=[] for i in range(100000): data.append({'a':np.random.random(), 'n':np.random.random(), 'o':np.random.random(), 'u':np.random.random()})

def func1(data): x = n = o = u = 0 items = itemgetter('a','n','o','u') for entry in data: A,N,O,U = items(entry) x += A*N # n - number of data points n += N o += O #don't know what you're doing with O or U, but I'll leave them u += U

    average = int(round(x / n)), n, o, u
    return average

def func2(data): mean_a = np.sum(np.array([d['a'] for d in data]) * np.array([d['n'] for d in data])/len(data) return (mean_a, np.sum([d['n'] for d in data]), np.sum([d['o'] for d in data]), np.sum([d['u'] for d in data]) )

def func3(data): dframe = DataFrame(data) return np.sum((dframe["a"]*dframe["n"])) / dframe.shape[0], np.sum(dframe["n"]), np.sum(dframe["o"]), np.sum(dframe["u"])

In [3]: %timeit func1(data) 10 loops, best of 3: 59.6 ms per loop

In [4]: %timeit func2(data) 10 loops, best of 3: 138 ms per loop

In [5]: %timeit func3(data) 10 loops, best of 3: 129 ms per loop

If you are doing other operations on the data, I would definitely look into using the Pandas package. It's DataFrame object is a nice match to the list of dictionaries that you are working with. I think that the majority of the overhead is IO operations of getting the data into numpy arrays or DataFrame objects.

share|improve this answer
1  
I can't believe itemgetter beats numpy. I suppose the bottleneck here really is getting the data out of the dictionary and into a form that numpy likes. – mgilson Oct 22 '12 at 17:52
1  
Yup. I was shocked. I think its definitely IO getting into numpy arrays that is causing the bottleneck. – reptilicus Oct 22 '12 at 17:55
1  
I wouldn't necessarily use the term IO here, but you're right. (I generally think of IO as reading/writing to disk -- But you've built the list ahead of time). – mgilson Oct 22 '12 at 17:57
    
@mgilson, maybe call it "memory bottleneck" or something – Prof. Falken Oct 23 '12 at 6:18

if all you're looking to do is get an average value on something why not

sum_for_average = math.fsum(your_item)
average_of_list = sum_for_average / len(your_item)

no mucking about with numpy at all.

share|improve this answer
    
How do I convert the list of dictionaries into "your_list" ? – Prof. Falken Oct 22 '12 at 15:34
    
used 'your list' as a general placeholder text. if you've got a dictionary entry that's a set of numbers there's several functions in the math module that should do some good for you. – Jiynx Oct 22 '12 at 15:47
2  
Several? Such as? – Prof. Falken Oct 22 '12 at 15:49

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