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I'm trying to have an ellipsis animate, and was wondering if it was possible with CSS animations...

So it might be like

Loading...
Loading..
Loading.
Loading...
Loading..

And basically just continue like that. Any ideas?

Edit: like this: http://playground.magicrising.de/demo/ellipsis.html

share|improve this question
2  
Animations are not transforms are not transitions. Please don't get the three of them mixed up. –  BoltClock Oct 23 '12 at 8:05
1  
Don't care. Thanks though. –  xckpd7 Oct 23 '12 at 14:24
    
See my answer to a similar question: stackoverflow.com/a/24349758/282729 –  feklee Jun 24 at 9:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 23 down vote accepted

You could try to use the animation-delay property and time each ellipsis character. In this case I've put each ellipsis character in a <span class> so I can animate them separately.

I made a demo, which isn't perfect, but it shows at least what I mean :)

The code from my example:

HTML

Loading<span class="one">.</span><span class="two">.</span><span class="three">.</span>​

CSS

.one {
    opacity: 0;
    -webkit-animation: dot 1.3s infinite;
    -webkit-animation-delay: 0.0s;
    animation: dot 1.3s infinite;
    animation-delay: 0.0s;
}

.two {
    opacity: 0;
    -webkit-animation: dot 1.3s infinite;
    -webkit-animation-delay: 0.2s;
    animation: dot 1.3s infinite;
    animation-delay: 0.2s;
}

.three {
    opacity: 0;
    -webkit-animation: dot 1.3s infinite;
    -webkit-animation-delay: 0.3s;
    animation: dot 1.3s infinite;
    animation-delay: 0.3s;
}

@-webkit-keyframes dot {
    0% {
        opacity: 0;
    }
    50% {
        opacity: 0;
    }
    100% {
        opacity: 1;
    }
}

@keyframes dot {
    0% {
        opacity: 0;
    }
    50% {
        opacity: 0;
    }
    100% {
        opacity: 1;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I like this idea and just expanded on it a bit to show "marching elipses": jsfiddle.net/toddwprice/cRLMw –  Todd Price Nov 14 '12 at 23:20
    
It didn't work(?), so I added display: inline; and then the dots. Is this how it was meant to work? jsfiddle.net/cRLMw/3 –  Christofer Vilander Nov 15 '12 at 10:25
2  
Sorry @Christofer -- forgot to save my updated fiddle. Here it is again: jsfiddle.net/toddwprice/cRLMw/8 Also, here's an article I just read that has some interesting CSS animations: tympanus.net/Tutorials/LoadingAnimations/index4.html –  Todd Price Nov 16 '12 at 16:04
    
Using Firefox I can't drag it if I simply click and drag the image in one shot. But if I click on the image first and then click and drag, I am not prevented from dragging. –  Sam.Rueby Nov 8 '13 at 16:22
    
I tweaked the HTML and CSS a little to use <i> tags... jsfiddle.net/DkcD4/77 –  Adam Youngers Mar 20 at 19:02

Short answer is "not really". However, you can play around with animating width and overflow hidden, and maybe get an effect that is "close enough". (code below tailored for firefox only, add vendor prefixes as needed).

html

<div class="loading">Loading</div>

css

.loading:after {
    overflow: hidden;
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: bottom;
    -moz-animation: ellipsis 2s infinite;
    content: "\2026"; /* ascii code for the ellipsis character */
}
@-moz-keyframes ellipsis {
    from {
        width: 2px;
    }
    to {
        width: 15px;
    }
}

demo: http://jsfiddle.net/MDzsR/1/

edit

It appears chrome has issues with animating the pseudo-element. An easy fix is to wrap the ellipsis in its own element. Check out http://jsfiddle.net/MDzsR/4/

share|improve this answer
    
Not working in Chromium (yes, I changed the vendor-prefix to -webkit from -moz). –  David Thomas Oct 22 '12 at 18:34
    
@DavidThomas you're right - tested in chrome now and it seems it has issues with the pseudo element. You could wrap the ellipsis in its own element and animate that instead (would work in firefox too) jsfiddle.net/MDzsR/4 –  xec Oct 23 '12 at 7:52
    
Really nice solution, and just perfect for a Firefox OS app that I'm developing. Tweaked it a little bit: jsfiddle.net/feklee/x69uN –  feklee Jun 24 at 9:37

Well Actually there is a pure CSS way of doing this.

I got the example from CSS Tricks, but made it also to be supported in Internet Explorer (I have tested it in 10+).

Check the Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/Roobyx/AT6v6/2/

HTML:

<h4 id="searching-ellipsis"> Searching
    <span>.</span>
    <span>.</span>
    <span>.</span>
</h4>

CSS:

@-webkit-keyframes opacity {
  0% {
    filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Alpha(Opacity=100);
    opacity: 1;
  }
  100% {
    filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Alpha(Opacity=0);
    opacity: 0;
  }
}

@-moz-keyframes opacity {
  0% {
    filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Alpha(Opacity=100);
    opacity: 1;
  }

  100% {
    filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Alpha(Opacity=0);
    opacity: 0;
  }
}

@-webkit-keyframes opacity {
  0% {
    filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Alpha(Opacity=100);
    opacity: 1;
  }
  100% {
    filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Alpha(Opacity=0);
    opacity: 0;
  }
}

@-moz-keyframes opacity {
  0% {
    filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Alpha(Opacity=100);
    opacity: 1;
  }
  100% {
    filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Alpha(Opacity=0);
    opacity: 0;
  }
}

@-o-keyframes opacity {
  0% {
    filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Alpha(Opacity=100);
    opacity: 1;
  }
  100% {
    filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Alpha(Opacity=0);
    opacity: 0;
  }
}

@keyframes opacity {
  0% {
    filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Alpha(Opacity=100);
    opacity: 1;
  }
  100% {
    filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Alpha(Opacity=0);
    opacity: 0;
  }
}
#searching-ellipsis span {
  -webkit-animation-name: opacity;
  -webkit-animation-duration: 1s;
  -webkit-animation-iteration-count: infinite;
  -moz-animation-name: opacity;
  -moz-animation-duration: 1s;
  -moz-animation-iteration-count: infinite;
  -ms-animation-name: opacity;
  -ms-animation-duration: 1s;
  -ms-animation-iteration-count: infinite;
}
#searching-ellipsis span:nth-child(2) {
  -webkit-animation-delay: 100ms;
  -moz-animation-delay: 100ms;
  -ms-animation-delay: 100ms;
  -o-animation-delay: 100ms;
  animation-delay: 100ms;
}
#searching-ellipsis span:nth-child(3) {
  -webkit-animation-delay: 300ms;
  -moz-animation-delay: 300ms;
  -ms-animation-delay: 300ms;
  -o-animation-delay: 300ms;
  animation-delay: 300ms;
}
share|improve this answer
    
You are adding proprietary IE-only filters in mozilla-specific and webkit-specific keyframes. How is this an improvement over the already accepted solution? It even has the same issue (in frames 4 and 5 only the two last and very last dots are visible, respectively, as opposed to what is outlined in the question, which has 3 repeating states, not 5) –  xec May 14 at 21:41
    
The question is about creating loading dots, and there is just a near example, not mandatory. What I have added is prefixes, so IE can recognize it better and display it. –  Roobyx May 29 at 11:59
1  
-webkit-keyframes will only apply to webkit, and inside you have IE-only code. This code does nothing but waste space. –  xec May 30 at 9:17

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