Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have inherited code, trying to compile with gcc on Linux.

what library am I looking for that has __builtin_ia32_stmxcsr ?

apologies -- i was too fast to submit; running gcc inside of Nvidia Eclipse. actual error message is "Functuion . . . could not be resolved" so i jumped the conclusion i needed to reference some lib. As the offending lines hav a :#if defined(SSE) I take it to mean that the -msse2 switch is present although i cannot seem to find a copyh of the compile command line. [just learning this Eclipse tool -- very new!]

share|improve this question
    
apologies -- i was too fast to submit; running gcc inside of Nvidia Eclipse. actual error message is "Functuion . . . could not be resolved" so i jumped the conclusion i needed to reference some lib. As the offending lines:#if defined(SSE) orig_mxcsr = __builtin_ia32_stmxcsr (); our_mxcsr = orig_mxcsr | MXCSR_DAZ | MXCSR_FTZ; __builtin_ia32_ldmxcsr (our_mxcsr); #endif – JPM Oct 22 '12 at 20:31
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is a bug in eclipses indexer with gcc's __builtin* functions. The bug report is at https://bugs.eclipse.org/bugs/show_bug.cgi?id=352537

The problem is that even the glibc/gcc libraries themselves use these __builtin* functions, so eclipse complains about a faulty xmmintrin.h etc., which is of course nonsense.

There is a workaround given in the bug report, you can add the function prototypes as user defined macros for the indexer, but of course this becomes tedious if there are a few more and some type checking abilities are lost.

share|improve this answer
    
turns out I had a power outage; when i rebooted and restarted eclipse the problem disappeared! Thanks for your help. – JPM Oct 23 '12 at 12:59

You don't need to link with anything - the "builtin" in the name is a clue that it's a gcc built-in (intrinsic) compiler function.

However you do need to be compiling for an x86 target with SSE enabled for this to be recognised, e.g. gcc -msse2 ....

Note that you can use the _mm_getcsr intrinsic from <xmmintrin.h> instead of __builtin_ia32_stmxcsr - this would be a little more portable.

share|improve this answer
1  
Right. And bravo for pointing out that __builtin_ should be avoided when equivalent portable intrinsics are available. – Stephen Canon Oct 22 '12 at 15:58
    
thanks. i tried your suggestion of _mm_getcsr; still get error message of this function ... could not be resolved. any thoughts ? – JPM Oct 22 '12 at 20:51
    
Did you #include <xmmintrin.h> ? Note also that you can temporarily #ifdef out this block of code if it's holding you up - it just turns off denormal handling for performance reasons - you can omit this for now and get the rest of the code compiling and come back to it later - it won't affect functionality, just performance. – Paul R Oct 22 '12 at 21:49
1  
Good suggestions, but actually this is a bug in eclipse. – hirschhornsalz Oct 23 '12 at 8:45
    
@hirschhornsalz: thanks for the clarification - I don't use Eclipse and wasn't aware that it had this problem. – Paul R Oct 23 '12 at 8:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.