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I have installed xmedcon-0.11.0-1.i686.rpm on my Fedora Linux machine. I ran the RPM file. Since I'm kind of new to Linux, I want to ask, where can I find the installed file and how can I run it?

Thanks.

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closed as off-topic by Perception, Eitan T, Yu Hao, rcs, 010100110110100101101101 Oct 22 '13 at 5:41

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It looks like you just need to type the command in terminal as described here: xmedcon.sourceforge.net/Docs/ProgramGUI . Also, chances are the RPM has added an item to some menu. Look for it. –  full.stack.ex Oct 22 '12 at 15:57
    
This is off-topic for Stack Overflow. You might want to ask about this on Unix.SE or Super User (but search for it there first!). –  Eliah Kagan Jan 9 '13 at 4:39

2 Answers 2

From terminal use

$ rpm -ql xmedcon-0.11.0-1.i686 </code>
/etc/xmedconrc
/usr/bin/medcon
/usr/bin/xmedcon

You will see all the files installed. The main files will be above. From command line run

$ /usr/bin/xmedcon 
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In case you already know the command name, you can type which medcon in a terminal and it should tell you where the executable is located.

And as full.stack.xchg said, just typing the name of the executable on a command line (or finding it in the graphical menu) will start the program.

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