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I was wondering how to solve this question, which I'm told should be done with DeMorgan's Law.

M = X*(BAR(Y + Z)) + (X + BAR(Y))*(X + BAR(Z))

I am supposed to find a sum of products.

EDIT: The link for the identities can be found here De Morgan Laws

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closed as too localized by Shiraz Bhaiji, brendan, martin clayton, ughoavgfhw, mnel Oct 23 '12 at 3:19

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if you go to wikipedia and type in demorgans law you can see the identitys, DeMorgans Law has two specific ones – Masterminder Oct 22 '12 at 16:31
    
Perhaps you are looking at a different page to us? Why not share the link in your question? – Andy Hayden Oct 22 '12 at 16:48
    
Is BAR the complement? What are those operators supposed to be? There is no addition and multiplication in either set theory or logic. – poke Oct 22 '12 at 16:49
    
    
scroll down to engineering section for the identities – Masterminder Oct 22 '12 at 16:50

You can use de Morgan or you can just get it directly form the truth table:

X Y Z   M

0 0 0   1
0 0 1   0
0 1 0   0
0 1 1   0
1 0 0   1
1 0 1   1
1 1 0   1
1 1 1   1

So:

M = X+(Y+Z)'
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I’m going to use the mathematical symbols, for or, for and, and ¬ for not.

M = X ∧ ( ¬( Y ∨ Z ) ) ∨ ( X ∨ ¬Y ) ∧ ( X ∨ ¬Z )
  ⇔ X ∧ ( ¬Y ∧ ¬Z ) ∨ ( X ∨ ¬Y ) ∧ ( X ∨ ¬Z )
  ⇔ ( X ∧ ( ¬Y ∧ ¬Z ) ) ∨ ( ( X ∨ ¬Y ) ∧ ( X ∨ ¬Z ) )
  ⇔ ( X ∧ ¬Y ∧ ¬Z ) ∨ ( X ∨ ( ¬Y ∧ ¬Z ) )
  ⇔ ( X ∧ ¬Y ∧ ¬Z ) ∨ X ∨ ¬( Y ∨ Z )
  ⇔ X ∨ ¬( Y ∨ Z )

The last line can be done because X ∧ ¬Y ∧ ¬Z => X whereas X alone evaluates M to true, so that operand is not necessary.

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Nice - and the result matches mine derived form a truth table, which is comforting. – Paul R Oct 22 '12 at 17:22
    
how do you go from line 3 to line 4. I thought on line 3: ( ( X ∨ ¬Y ) ∧ ( X ∨ ¬Z ) ) = ( ( X ∧ X ) ∨ ( X ∧ ¬Y ) ∨ ( X ∧ ¬Z ) ∨( X ∧ ¬Z )) = ( X ∨ ( X ∧ ¬Y ) ∨ ( X ∧ ¬Z ) ∨( X ∧ ¬Z )) – Masterminder Oct 23 '12 at 2:03
    
That’s because logical OR and AND are distributive. So (A ∨ B) ∧ (A ∨ C) is equivalent with A ∧ (B ∨ C). You seem to expand (X ∨ ¬Y) to X ∨ (X ∧ ¬Y), which is not the same as X does not need to be true, so ¬Y is actually important for the result. And in the second part, you just repeat the (X ∧ ¬Z) once more which won’t do anything. – poke Oct 23 '12 at 8:24

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