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How can I find the minimum value from a vector?

int main()
{
    int v[100] = {5,14,2,4,6};
    int n = 5;
    int mic = v[0];
    for(int i=0;i<v[n];i++)
    {
        if(v[i]<mic)
        mic=v[i];
    }
    cout<<mic;
}

But is not working, what can I do?

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closed as too localized by Sam, jogojapan, M42, Waynn Lue, Ramesh Oct 23 '12 at 8:03

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3  
What's the logic behind i<v[n]? :) –  Kiril Kirov Oct 22 '12 at 16:47
2  
Let me guess, another homework? First of all, v is not a vector (the question is marked as C++), it is a C-style array. What does "it is not working" mean? What have you tried to make it work? –  BasicWolf Oct 22 '12 at 16:48
    
well , it was loop only through v[n] elements but I've tried to test the array adding same value –  Cristi DroPs Oct 22 '12 at 16:48
    
Is not showing the minimum value which is 2 –  Cristi DroPs Oct 22 '12 at 16:49
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7 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have an error in your code. This line:

for(int i=0;i<v[n];i++)

should be

for(int i=0;i<n;i++)

because you want to search n places in your vector, not v[n] places (which wouldn't mean anything)

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std::min_element(vec.begin(), vec.end()) - for std::vector
std::min_element(v, v+n) - for array

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6  
std::min_element( std::begin(v), std::end(v) ) for an array in C++11. Pre-C++11, whatever you named the corresponding functions in your toolbox. –  James Kanze Oct 22 '12 at 16:49
    
Not like that , I want "oldschool" –  Cristi DroPs Oct 22 '12 at 16:50
    
Also use std::array<T, N> instead of T[N]. –  daknøk Oct 22 '12 at 16:50
3  
@Cristi For the record, min_element is from the last millenium. Is that old school enough? ;) –  R. Martinho Fernandes Oct 22 '12 at 16:51
    
@JamesKanze - Note that his array has dimension 100, but only the first n elements are to be considered. –  Robᵩ Oct 22 '12 at 17:00
show 2 more comments
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm> // std::min_element
#include <iterator>  // std::begin, std::end

int main() {
    std::vector<int> v = {5,14,2,4,6};
    auto result = std::min_element(std::begin(v), std::end(v));
    if (std::end(v)!=result)
        std::cout << *result << '\n';
}

The program you show has a few problems, the primary culprit being the for condition: i<v[n]. You initialize the array, setting the first 5 elements to various values and the rest to zero. n is set to the number of elements you explicitly initialized so v[n] is the first element that was implicitly initialized to zero. Therefore the loop condition is false the first time around and the loop does not run at all; your code simply prints out the first element.

Some minor issues:

  • avoid raw arrays; they behave strangely and inconsistently (e.g., implicit conversion to pointer to the array's first element, can't be assigned, can't be passed to/returned from functions by value)

  • avoid magic numbers. int v[100] is an invitation to a bug if you want your array to get input from somewhere and then try to handle more than 100 elements.

  • avoid using namespace std; It's not a big deal in implementation files, although IMO it's better to just get used to explicit qualification, but it can cause problems if you blindly use it everywhere because you'll put it in header files and start causing unnecessary name conflicts.

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std::min_element(), std::begin(), and std::end, please. –  Robᵩ Oct 22 '12 at 16:59
    
@Robᵩ I'm still undecided on whether I like using (abusing?) ADL this way... probably best not to in example code like this though. –  bames53 Oct 22 '12 at 17:08
    
I sincerely apologize. I thought your code was ill-formed. I didn't consider ADL, I thought you had a using namespace std; hidden somewhere. –  Robᵩ Oct 22 '12 at 17:18
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template <class ForwardIterator>
ForwardIterator min_element ( ForwardIterator first, ForwardIterator last )
{
    ForwardIterator lowest = first;
    if (first == last) return last;
    while (++first != last)
    if (*first < *lowest) 
        lowest = first;
    return lowest;
}
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Try this with

 std::min_element(v.begin(),v.end())
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You can always use the stl std::min_element(v.begin(),v.end()) . Hope this helps

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#include <iostream>
int main()
{
    int v[100] = {5,14,2,4,6};
    int n = 5;
    int mic = v[0];
    for(int i = 0; i != n; ++i)
    {
        if(v[i] < mic)
        mic = v[i];
    }
    std:cout << mic << std::endl;;
}
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