Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Guys, I have the following code that is inside a big while loop that iterates over a tree. This is as fast as I can get this routine but I have to use a goto. I am not fundamentally against goto but if I can avoid them I would like to. (I am not trying to start a flame war, please.)

The constraints:

  1. The current=current->child() is expensive (it's a shared_ptr) so I'd like to minimize the use of that operation at all cost.
  2. After the operation current should be the last child it found.
  3. cnt must count each child it encounters.
  4. cnt++ will be replaced by some other operation (or several operations) and should only appear once :)

the code:

insideloopy:
cnt++;
if ( current->hasChild() )
{
    current = current->child();
    goto insideloopy;
}

Edit: Sorry guys, originally forgot to mention cnt++ should only appear once. It will be some kind of operation on the node, and should thus only be there one time. I'm also trying to avoid making that another function call.

share|improve this question
    
You should specify which language –  Runscope API Tools Aug 19 '09 at 18:21
4  
looks like someone needs help on their homework... –  Tony Aug 19 '09 at 18:24
    
not homework :) ,.. actual work :) had brain freeze –  Ron Aug 19 '09 at 18:32
    
how is shared_ptr expensive ? –  George Godik Aug 19 '09 at 18:47
1  
I did some profiling comparing the tree iteration with raw pointers and shared pointers. Without going into great detail here are some quick numbers: 20000 iterations over 1 tree: Raw Pointers : 150 ms Shared Pointer unoptimized implementation: 1400ms Shared Pointer optimized: 577ms. Shared_ptr are slower as they do reference counting and every time you do current=current->child() a lot of stuff happens in the background compared to a simple raw pointer assignment. So for the benefits they give I'll take the slow down. –  Ron Aug 19 '09 at 18:51

8 Answers 8

up vote 11 down vote accepted
insideloopy:
cnt++;
if ( current->hasChild() )
{
    current = current->child();
    goto insideloopy;
}

I love infinite loops.

while (true) {
   cnt++;
   if (!current->hasChild()) break;
   current = current->child();
}

Of course you can do it in many other ways (see other answers). do while, put the check in the while, etc. In my solution, I wanted to map nearly to what you are doing (an infinite goto, unless break)

share|improve this answer
    
Fantastic! Good work. I just couldn't get my brain in action this morning. –  Ron Aug 19 '09 at 18:31
    
This one is a little better than LorenVS' infinite loop version, because of the inverted logic. I still think my comma operator use is warranted and more readable though :P –  Thorarin Aug 19 '09 at 18:33
    
@unknown: didn't you said, that you trying to avoid extra if? –  Artem Barger Aug 19 '09 at 18:34
3  
doesn't the while(true) pretty much become an unconditional jump? –  Ron Aug 19 '09 at 18:36
    
I too prefer the reversed if logic here - but I feel LorenVS 6 minute earlier version was robbed of the accepted answer rep. ;) He'll have to settle for my measly +1. –  Aardvark Aug 19 '09 at 18:43

Original answer

Assuming this is C or C++:

while (cnt++, current->hasChild())
{
    current = current->child();
}

I'm not a big fan of the comma operator usually, but I don't like repeating myself either :)

Updated 'fun' answer

After learning that cnt++ is actually some multiline operation, this particular syntax would be less than ideal. Something more along the lines of your accepted answer would be better.

If you want to be really funky, this would also work:

do 
{
    cnt++;
} while (current->hasChild() && (current = current->child()));

Now I feel really dirty though, with my abusing the short circuiting on the && operator :)

Sane answer

Exercises in compactness aside and striving for readable code, I'm forced to conclude that one of the existing answers is best suited (I'm just including this for completeness' sake):

while (true)
{
   cnt++;
   if (!current->hasChild()) break;
   current = current->child();
}

The while (true) will be optimized by the compiler into a regular infinite loop, so there is only one conditional statement (if you care about that).

The only thing going against this solution is if your node operation was a long piece of code. I don't mind infinite loops so much, as long as I can see where they terminate at a glance. Then again, if it were really long, it should be a function anyway.

share|improve this answer
1  
Works in C as well, I think. –  dave4420 Aug 19 '09 at 18:26
    
In this case, works very well, and you can pack everything on a single line. –  Stefano Borini Aug 19 '09 at 18:37
    
that is very compact indeed! :) and would work for the example but the cnt++ will be multiple operation in the actually application. Not sure what that will look like. Not a big fan of the comma operator either. –  Ron Aug 19 '09 at 18:41
    
@Ron: with multiple statements, your accepted answer is probably the best solution. Too bad you didn't put that in your original question :P @Stefano: I'd split it over 2 lines I think. Some code style nazis don't like omitting braces though :( –  Thorarin Aug 19 '09 at 18:45
    
Sorry about that. This was my first question here and I never expected it to be such a race to get the first answer! –  Ron Aug 19 '09 at 18:56
cnt++;
while(current->hasChild())
{
   cnt++;
   current = current->child();
}

EDIT:

If you only want cnt++ to be in your code once:

while(true)
{
    cnt++;
    if(current->hasChild())
       current = current->child();
    else
       break;
}
share|improve this answer
    
cnt++ should only appear once. –  Stefano Borini Aug 19 '09 at 18:25
    
you can avoid if statement by using do while loop, instead. –  Artem Barger Aug 19 '09 at 18:28
    
i'm trying to avoid the extra if,.. keep it fast :) –  Ron Aug 19 '09 at 18:29
1  
Very close to the solution that I ended up accepting. Not sure who was first though, tried to upvote your comment though. –  Ron Aug 19 '09 at 18:33
1  
@Thorarin. they are not necessary evil, provided they finish, and they are kept small. –  Stefano Borini Aug 19 '09 at 18:35

You can use break to get out of the loop in the middle of the code:

while (true) {
   cnt++;
   if (!current->hasChild()) break;
   current = current->child();
}
share|improve this answer
    
yep! That's it. –  Ron Aug 19 '09 at 18:38
    
no need to break; that's just a hidden goto, imho. –  xtofl Aug 19 '09 at 18:55
2  
@xtofl: Yes, but one that has a well-defined and easy to find target. That makes a lot of difference. –  sbi Aug 19 '09 at 19:43

while (current->hasChild()) { cnt++; current = current->child(); }

Or am I missing something?

share|improve this answer
1  
that misses the first child. –  Ron Aug 19 '09 at 18:27
for(cnt++ ; current->hasChild() ; cnt++) {
   current = current->child();
}
share|improve this answer
    
except for the fact that cnt++ is probably going to be multiple statements... –  xtofl Aug 19 '09 at 18:56
    
So? The comma operator could be used here if the cnt++ has to expand to multiple statements. Not that it would be a good idea... –  user57368 Aug 19 '09 at 20:31
    
if cnt++ is multiple statements, it should perhaps be a function rather. And you can easily do for(cnt++,i = 0,current=firstChild(); ...; ...) if you need to. –  nos Aug 20 '09 at 8:55

I'd investigate the possibility of making current->child() return NULL when it has no child if it doesn't already -- that seems the best possible result and leaving it undefined in this case seems error prone -- and then use:

for (; current; current = current->child())
{
    cnt++;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
The current->child() call is expensive compared to the hasChild() call. hence I want to avoid it if possible. –  Ron Aug 19 '09 at 19:04
1  
Is current->child() expensive even if hasChild() return false? If so, I'd simply wrap it with an hasChild() precondition. –  AProgrammer Aug 19 '09 at 19:11
    
That would violate the second constraint however: After the operation current should be the last child it found. –  Thorarin Aug 19 '09 at 19:42

No break statements:

notDone=true;
while(notDone){
   cnt++;
   if ( current->hasChild() ){
       current = current->child();
   } else {
       notDone=false;
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Avoiding break is overrated, imo. Are you going to be proving correctness for this algorithm? Will break make it that much harder? –  Thorarin Aug 19 '09 at 21:11
1  
Break won't make it harder - it will introduce two possible code paths to the first statement after the loop, which requires analysis of both prior states. But the code above has two possible code paths to the loop-end where the condition is re-checked ("if" clause and "else" clause), which requires analysis of both prior states. "else" is just goto in disguise ;-) –  Steve Jessop Aug 19 '09 at 22:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.