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I am absolutly new to C and I tried to initialzie a array in a function.

But it doesn't work, because if I want to print the values in the main method I always get a Segmentation fault.

 static void array(int *i)
{
    int j = 0;
    i = (int *) malloc(5 * sizeof (int));
    for (j = 0; j < 5; j++) {
        i[j] = j;
    }

    for (j = 0; j < 5; j++) {
        printf("Hello: %d\n", i[j]);
    }
}

/* Main entry point */
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int j;
    int *i = NULL;

    array(i);
    for (j = 0; j < 5; j++) {
        printf("Hello: %d\n", i[j]);
    }
    return 0;
}

Would be nice if someone could fix the code and could explain how it works.

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3  
i = (int *) malloc(5 * sizeof (int)); only affects the copy of the pointer the function got, not the pointer in the caller. Let me find a duplicate. –  Daniel Fischer Oct 22 '12 at 19:12
    
In other words: the pointer is passed as value, not as reference, and thus doesn't get updated. The value for i got its original value when you exit array() function. –  m0skit0 Oct 22 '12 at 19:14
    
Don't cast the result of malloc. –  chris Oct 22 '12 at 19:23
    
But I think we have to cast the result of malloc the be compatible with c++. –  MeJ Oct 22 '12 at 19:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
static void array(int **i)
{
    int j = 0;
    *i = malloc(5 * sizeof (int));
    for (j = 0; j < 5; j++) {
        (*i)[j] = j;
    }

    for (j = 0; j < 5; j++) {
        printf("Hello: %d\n", (*i)[j]);
    }
}

/* Main entry point */
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int j;
    int *i = NULL;

    array(&i);
    for (j = 0; j < 5; j++) {
        printf("Hello: %d\n", i[j]);
    }
    return 0;
}

You are passing a pointer by value into array, so what you need to do is pass a pointer to your pointer instead, then set/use that.


As for why you shouldn't cast the result of a malloc, see: Do I cast the result of malloc? and Specifically, what's dangerous about casting the result of malloc?

share|improve this answer
    
Lets say that we want to copy a other array int this one: how would i work: memcpy(i, j, 5 sizeof (int)); Why do I have to use *i and not &i in this function? –  MeJ Oct 22 '12 at 19:28
    
Isn't it already using &i? –  farmdve Oct 22 '12 at 19:33
    
No I have to use *i, otherwise it wouldn't work but why? –  MeJ Oct 22 '12 at 19:40
    
in array i is a pointer to your i in main, so to refer to that i in main, you have to use *i. –  hexist Oct 22 '12 at 19:41
1  
Remove the superfluous, dangerous cast of malloc's return value and I'll upvote this. I know it is there in the OP's code, but we shouldn't teach anyone to do that. –  Lundin Oct 22 '12 at 19:49

In order to allocate memory to a variable from within a function, you must pass a pointer to a pointer as the function argument, dereference the pointer and then allocate the memory.

or in pseudo-code

function(int **i)
{
    *i = malloc...
}
int *i = NULL;
function(&i);

This is one of the ways to do it. You could also return the pointer which malloc returns. And, from the material I've read, it's a good practice to NOT cast the return type of malloc.

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