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Here is my code:

int main(){

long userInput;
long placeArray[userInput +1];
long divisionPlace, modPlace;
long number = userInput;
long two = 2;

cout << "enter: ";
cin >> userInput;


for (int i = 1; i < userInput; i++) {
    divisionPlace = number / two;
    modPlace = number % two;
    placeArray[number - i ] = modPlace;
}

for (int i = 0; i < userInput; i++) {
    cout << placeArray[i] << " ";
}
cout <<endl;

return 0;
}

Can someone point out my error in the code as to why I am mishandling memory?

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closed as too localized by H2CO3, Tim Post Oct 23 '12 at 1:56

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6  
You're using userInput uninitialized. You should get a compiler warning for that if you turn the warnings on. –  chris Oct 22 '12 at 19:13
    
The uninitialized userInput is definitely the root problem, but note also you're using the uninitialized userInput to a) attempt to determine the amount of storage for placeArray, and b) initialize number, which while technically not used uninitialized, is essentially randomly initialized. Since number is not reliably intialized, then placeArray[number - i] makes no sense, either. –  twalberg Oct 22 '12 at 19:29
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As was mentioned in a comment, you're using userInput before it's initialized here:

long placeArray[userInput +1];

So placeArray is not going to have the size you expect it to when you access it in the loop below. This will lead to writing to memory you didn't allocate, and will mess up your stack.

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Thanks obvious mistake I made. Too much going on smh... –  danielBB Oct 23 '12 at 1:02
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Your array is allocated incorrectly.

long userInput;

cout << "enter: "; 
cin >> userInput; 

if (userInput <= 0)
{
   cerr << "error" << endl;
   exit(1);
}

long* placeArray = new long[userInput +1]; 

long divisionPlace, modPlace; 
long number = userInput; 
long two = 2; 

for (int i = 1; i < userInput; i++) { 
    divisionPlace = number / two; 
    modPlace = number % two; 
    placeArray[number - i ] = modPlace; 
} 

for (int i = 0; i < userInput; i++) { 
    cout << placeArray[i] << " "; 
} 
cout <<endl; 

delete [] placeArray;
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Not sure that's right either... Surely you really only need to allocate about log10(userInput) array elements... Otherwise, I'ma make your machine's virtual memory system die a slow, horrible death... –  twalberg Oct 22 '12 at 19:30
    
LOL @twalberg I just allocated as much mem as the OP supposedly wanted. Maybe the purpose of his program is to let users test random memory allocations. –  Geoff Montee Oct 22 '12 at 19:35
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