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In C arrays why is this true? a[5] == 5[a]

This question asks why

a[5] == 5[a]

It is answered in all aspects except one...

Why is one allowed to put an array subscript after an integer in the first place? And why isn't one allowed to write something like

[a]5

or

[5]a

or put [] in some other odd place?

In other words, what is the definition of where an array index operator is allowed?

EDIT I: The answers I received that quote the the standard were a little hard to grasp at first. But with the help of the responders I now understand. An array subscript (a square bracket) is allowed after a pointer or an integer. If it follows a pointer, what's inside the brackets must be an integer. If it follows an integer, what's inside the brackets must be a pointer.

I'm accepting the less upvoted answer because he did a bit more hand-holding in getting me to understand the quote from the standard. But the answer that strictly quotes the standard is correct too. It was just harder to understand at first.

EDIT II: I do not think my question was a duplicate. My question was about the allowed grammar regarding the array subscript operator. It was answered by quotes from the standard that never appear in the question I supposedly duplicated. It is similar, yes, but not a duplicate.

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marked as duplicate by Lundin, netcoder, Blastfurnace, ughoavgfhw, Suma Oct 23 '12 at 9:09

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1  
Because the C standard explicitly says that E1[E2] is identical to *(E1+E2) and + is a commutative operator. –  Alexey Frunze Oct 22 '12 at 19:17
1  
That question answers your question: "In other words, what is the definition of where an array index operator is allowed? " "in C Programming Language (aka: K & R)". –  m0skit0 Oct 22 '12 at 19:18
    
I dont quite see the answer. For example, can I legally write 7.3[b]? And if not, why not? –  John Fitzpatrick Oct 22 '12 at 19:22
    
@JohnFitzpatrick Array subscripts and all pointer arithmetic is done with integers and it's meaningless to use non-integers there if you think of it. You address integral values, not fractions like 1/10th of a bit. –  Alexey Frunze Oct 22 '12 at 19:23
    
@JohnFitzpatrick No, you can't. If one of the operands of + is a pointer, the other shall have an integer type. ((int)7.3)["Harr Harr"] should work, though. –  Daniel Fischer Oct 22 '12 at 19:23
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Postfix expression grammar from the C11 standard:

postfix-expression:
    primary-expression
    postfix-expression [ expression ]
    postfix-expression ( argument-expression-listopt )
    postfix-expression . identifier
    postfix-expression -> identifier
    postfix-expression ++
    postfix-expression --
    ( type-name ) { initializer-list }
    ( type-name ) { initializer-list , }

Primary expression grammar from the C11 standard:

primary-expression:
    identifier
    constant
    string-literal
    ( expression )
    generic-selection

And so on. 5 is an integer constant, so 5[a] match this:

postfix-expression [ expression ]

Hope this is what you mean.

EDIT: I forgot to mention this, but other comments already did:

One of the expressions shall have type ‘‘pointer to complete object type’’, the other expression shall have integer type, and the result has type ‘‘type’’.

That 'integer type' it's needed to forbid non-sense floating-point constants subscripting.

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Yes thanks to you and ouah I now see that I need to grasp the concept of a postfix-expression. Off I go to learn... –  John Fitzpatrick Oct 22 '12 at 19:32
    
I have to unaccept your answer for now because I am not able to see why 7.3[5] is not a valid expression given the grammar you quote above. 7.5 is a constant, thus being a primary-expression. So what in the standard says that it cant be followed by a square bracket? –  John Fitzpatrick Oct 22 '12 at 21:00
    
I wrote it, it's the last quote from the standard. There is not just the grammar, there are also "constraints" in the standard. As I wrote: "One of the expressions shall have type 'pointer to complete object type', the other expression shall have integer type"; 7.2 is not integer neither a pointer, it's a floating-point constant, so it's not a valid postfix-expression for the array subscript operator. A constraint is "restriction, either syntactic or semantic, by which the exposition of language elements is to be interpreted". –  effeffe Oct 22 '12 at 21:22
    
OK, yes, now I get it. I'm a little slow. E1 and E2 must be a pointer and an integer in either order. Thanks for you patience. –  John Fitzpatrick Oct 23 '12 at 6:50
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a[5] translates to *(a+5). Addition is commutative, so a+5 = 5+a, which can be translated back to 5[a]. I agree it's a rather useless feature, but hell, why not?

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1  
Surely *(a + 5) –  Dietrich Epp Oct 22 '12 at 19:18
    
@DietrichEpp brainfart. –  Luchian Grigore Oct 22 '12 at 19:18
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Defined in the Array subscripting operator section of the C Standard here:

(C99, 6.5.2.1p2) "A postfix expression followed by an expression in square brackets [] is a subscripted designation of an element of an array object. The definition of the subscript operator [] is that E1[E2] is identical to (*((E1)+(E2)))."

and regarding the allowed types of E1 and E2:

(C99, 6.5.2.1p1) "One of the expressions shall have type ‘‘pointer to object type’’, the other expression shall have integer type, and the result has type ‘‘type’’."

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But this doesn't state [E1]E2 is also valid, which is actually the question. –  m0skit0 Oct 22 '12 at 19:19
1  
@m0skit0: Since E1 and E2 are free variables, they are interchangeable. –  Dietrich Epp Oct 22 '12 at 19:20
    
@m0skit0 The OP didn't ask about [E1]E2! –  Alexey Frunze Oct 22 '12 at 19:20
    
The expressions are interchangeable, but not the notation. @AlexeyFrunze: "In other words, what is the definition of where an array index operator is allowed?" –  m0skit0 Oct 22 '12 at 19:25
    
@m0skit0 How about C99, 6.5.2c1: postfix-expression [ expression ]? –  Alexey Frunze Oct 22 '12 at 19:27
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