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I have this class:

public class StatInfo
{
  public string contact;
  public DateTime date;
  public string action;
}

then I have a list of StatInfo, but I'm not sure how to sort it according to the date field. Should I use the sort method? Should I create my own?

var _allStatInfo = new List<StatInfo>();
// adding lots of stuff in it
_allStatInfo.SortByDate???

What is the best way of doing this without having to write tons of code (if possible)?

Thanks

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Wait for Jon Skeet to show up. His C# in Depth: What you need to master C# 2 and 3 has a big section on just that. –  hughdbrown Aug 19 '09 at 18:37
    
Too late! I'm always surprised when one of my questions on C# doesn't get an answer from Jon Skeet :) –  marcgg Aug 19 '09 at 18:44
    
title is wrong. says "array" –  John Henckel yesterday

6 Answers 6

up vote 31 down vote accepted

Using LINQ:

var sortedList = _allStatInfo.OrderBy(si => si.date).ToList();

Sorting the original list:

_allStatInfo.Sort(new Comparison<StatInfo>((x, y) => DateTime.Compare(x.date, y.date)));
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, the second method worked. I don't use LINQ so I can't test the second one. –  marcgg Aug 19 '09 at 18:41

I see you've got the answer anyway, but...

  1. You can avoid some ugliness by just splitting the statement into two halves:

    Comparison<StatInfo> comparison = (x, y) => DateTime.Compare(x.date, y.date);
    _allStatInfo.Sort(comparison);
    

    You might want to consider just calling CompareTo directly, too:

    Comparison<StatInfo> comparison = (x, y) => x.date.CompareTo(y.date);
    _allStatInfo.Sort(comparison);
    
  2. You could create an IComparer<T> implementation using my ProjectionComparer class - it's part of MiscUtil, and I've included an uncommented version at the bottom of this answer. You'd then write:

    _allStatInfo.Sort(ProjectionComparer<StatInfo>.Create(x => x.date));
    
  3. Even if you're using .NET 2.0, you can still use LINQ by way of LINQBridge.

Here's the ProjectionComparer class required for the second answer. The first couple of classes are really just helpers to let generic type inference work better.

public static class ProjectionComparer
{
    public static ProjectionComparer<TSource, TKey> Create<TSource, TKey>
        (Func<TSource, TKey> projection)
    {
        return new ProjectionComparer<TSource, TKey>(projection);
    }

    public static ProjectionComparer<TSource, TKey> Create<TSource, TKey>
        (TSource ignored, Func<TSource, TKey> projection)
    {
        return new ProjectionComparer<TSource, TKey>(projection);
    }

}

public static class ProjectionComparer<TSource>
{
    public static ProjectionComparer<TSource, TKey> Create<TKey>
        (Func<TSource, TKey> projection)
    {
        return new ProjectionComparer<TSource, TKey>(projection);
    }
}

public class ProjectionComparer<TSource, TKey> : IComparer<TSource>
{
    readonly Func<TSource, TKey> projection;
    readonly IComparer<TKey> comparer;

    public ProjectionComparer(Func<TSource, TKey> projection)
        : this (projection, null)
    {
    }

    public ProjectionComparer(Func<TSource, TKey> projection,
                              IComparer<TKey> comparer)
    {
        projection.ThrowIfNull("projection");
        this.comparer = comparer ?? Comparer<TKey>.Default;
        this.projection = projection;
    }

    public int Compare(TSource x, TSource y)
    {
        // Don't want to project from nullity
        if (x==null && y==null)
        {
            return 0;
        }
        if (x==null)
        {
            return -1;
        }
        if (y==null)
        {
            return 1;
        }
        return comparer.Compare(projection(x), projection(y));
    }
}
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1  
Are you saying my code is ugly? :-( –  Ben M Aug 19 '09 at 20:05
    
Oh thanks, just when I was saying that I didn't get an answer from you on a C# question :) I'll keep Ben's answer accepted but I upvoted yours and I'm sure it will be right below –  marcgg Aug 19 '09 at 20:13
1  
@Ben: I just don't like that many brackets if I can help it :) –  Jon Skeet Aug 19 '09 at 20:38
    
Jon, in your Compare method, are the null checks really needed? That should be left to caller. –  nawfal Oct 23 '13 at 12:36
    
@nawfal: I don't so. You want to be able to order by foo => foo.Name without having to do foo => foo == null ? null : foo.Name IMO. –  Jon Skeet Oct 23 '13 at 12:37

To illustrate Robert C. Cartaino's answer:

public class StatInfo : IComparable<StatInfo>
{
    public string contact;
    public DateTime date;
    public string action;

    public int CompareTo(StatInfo value)
    {
        return this.date.CompareTo(value.date);
    }
}

var _allStatInfo = new List<StatInfo>();

// this now sorts by date
_allStatInfo.Sort();

Not the most general solution but good if you're only going to sort by date. And, as Robert said, you can still always override the default sort by passing an IComparer parameter to the sort method.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks. It does not apply really to my situation since I'll only sort by date in this particular situation, but I'll keep this in mind for later –  marcgg Aug 19 '09 at 20:15
    
@marcgg: The code in my answer makes sorting by date the default behavior. So if you are only sorting by date, I think that is exactly what you want. –  Dan Tao Aug 19 '09 at 20:30

Use a lambda expression to map a pair to a comparison:

_allStatInfo.Sort((x, y) => x.date - y.date);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer but I get an error: Cannot convert lambda expression to type System.Collections.Generic.IComparer<AdminTool.app.models.StatInfo>' because it is not a delegate type –  marcgg Aug 19 '09 at 18:38
    
You need at least C# 3.0 (Visual Studio 2008/any edition). –  Cecil Has a Name Aug 19 '09 at 18:43

For a DateTime there shouldn't be a need to compare.

_allStatInfo.OrderyBy(d => d.date);

or

_allStatInfo.OrderByDescending(d => d.Date);
share|improve this answer
    
Both methods return the list back, so you would need _allStatInfo = _allStatInfo.OrderBy(d => d.date).ToList(); –  TruthStands Aug 19 '09 at 18:42
    
Thanks, but a List<> has no such functions if I'm not mistaking –  marcgg Aug 19 '09 at 18:42
    
I guess this is LINQ. I'm not using LINQ –  marcgg Aug 19 '09 at 18:43

it worked for me ُSorting array of custom type using delegate

// sort array by name
Array.Sort(users, delegate(User user1, User user2) 
           {
             return user1.Name.CompareTo(user2.Name);
           });
// write array (output: Betty23 Lisa25 Susan20)
foreach (User user in users) Console.Write(user.Name + user.Age + " ");
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