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I'm having a very bizarre problem with the IShellDispatch COM interface, more specifically with the FolderItemVerbs object, that drives me nuts!

Calling FolderItemVerbs::Release() followed by CoUninitialze() will result in crash. It's clearly reproducible, but only happens 1 out of 10 times.

The crash is an "0xC0000005: Access Violation" error. Running the problematic code in a loop 100% reproduces the crash sooner or later :-(

Please see the example program:

static int TestProc(const TCHAR *pcDirectoryName, const TCHAR *pcFileName)
{
    int iSuccess = 0;

    IShellDispatch *pShellDispatch = NULL;
    Folder *pFolder = NULL; FolderItem *pItem = NULL;
    FolderItemVerbs *pVerbs = NULL;

    HRESULT hr = CoCreateInstance(CLSID_Shell, NULL, CLSCTX_INPROC_SERVER, IID_IShellDispatch, (void**)&pShellDispatch);
    if(FAILED(hr) || (pShellDispatch ==  NULL))
    {
        iSuccess = -3;
        return iSuccess;
    }

    variant_t vaDirectory(pcDirectoryName);
    hr = pShellDispatch->NameSpace(vaDirectory, &pFolder);
    if(FAILED(hr) || (pFolder == NULL))
    {
        iSuccess = -4;
        pShellDispatch->Release();
        return iSuccess;
    }

    variant_t vaFileName(pcFileName);
    hr = pFolder->ParseName(vaFileName, &pItem);
    if(FAILED(hr) || (pItem == NULL))
    {
        iSuccess = -5;
        pFolder->Release();
        pShellDispatch->Release();
        return iSuccess;
    }

    hr = pItem->Verbs(&pVerbs);
    if(FAILED(hr) || (pVerbs == NULL))
    {
        iSuccess = -6;
        pItem->Release();
        pFolder->Release();
        pShellDispatch->Release();
        return iSuccess;
    }

    /* Here we would do something with the FolderItemVerbs */

    pVerbs->Release(); pVerbs = NULL; //If this line is commented out, we don't get a crash, but a massive memory leak!
    pItem->Release(); pItem = NULL;
    pFolder->Release(); pFolder = NULL;
    pShellDispatch->Release(); pShellDispatch = NULL;

    iSuccess = 1;
    return iSuccess;
}

//-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

static unsigned __stdcall ThreadProc(void* pArguments)
{
    HRESULT hr = CoInitialize(NULL);
    if((hr == S_OK) || (hr == S_FALSE))
    {
        threadParam_t *params = (threadParam_t*) pArguments;
        params->returnValue = TestProc(params->pcDirectoryName, params->pcFileName);
        CoUninitialize();
    }
    else
    {
        if(threadParam_t *params = (threadParam_t*) pArguments)
        {
            params->returnValue = -10;
        }
    }

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}  

Please download the complete example code is here: http://pastie.org/private/0xsnajpia9lsmgnlf2afa

Please also note that I unambiguously tracked down to crash to FolderItemVerbs, because if I never create the FolderItemVerbs object, the crash is gone immediately.

Also if I never call "pVerbs->Release()" before CoUninitialize() the crash is gone too, but this will result in a massive memleak, obviously.

Another strange thing is that the crash will NOT happen, if I run the program under the Debugger! But I can run the program, wait for the crash and then let the Debugger handle the crash.

Unfortunately the Stack Trace that I get then doesn't help much: http://pastie.org/private/cuwunlun2t5dc5lembpw

I don't think I'm doing anything wrong here. I have checked the code over and over again in the last two days. So this all seems to be a bug in FolderItemVerbs!

Has anybody encountered this before and/or can confirm that this is a bug in FolderItemVerbs? Also, is there any workaround for the problem?

Thanks in advance !!!

share|improve this question
2  
Your code runs well for me. Call stack suggest that the problem is on worker thread, which not yours. I suppose the problem might be in some shell extension you have installed, not with the shell itself. –  Roman R. Oct 22 '12 at 19:41
    
Thank you for the answer. Unfortunately, even if this is caused by a "bad" shell extension, I would have to make sure my app works fine with the shell extension. The user might have a "bad" shell extension installed too! Is there a way I can prevent third-party shell extensions from injecting themselves into my process? Or is there anything I need to do to ensure that third-party shell extensions will "shutdown" gracefully? Regards. –  MuldeR Oct 22 '12 at 21:17
    
It would certainly be helpful if you manage to isolate the issue to specific module/extension that causes the problem. With this knowledge you would have more ideas on working things around. As a guess - I would try to not call CoUninitialize immediately. Instead, give it some time to cool down and wait dispatching messages for a second. Quite possibly, the worker thread just needs to report it's finished and then everything will shut down nicely. –  Roman R. Oct 22 '12 at 21:36
    
Another easy things for a try is to run the same code in x64 domain. If the troubling thingy is Win32 only, the code will work fine. –  Roman R. Oct 22 '12 at 21:38
1  
Agreed, the stack trace doesn't have anything to do with this code. Code that crashes over and over again like that is usually caused by a DLL getting unloaded too early. You'd see the notification in the VS Output window. –  Hans Passant Oct 22 '12 at 21:53

1 Answer 1

Thanks everybody!

Here is the "corrected" code which performs explicit message dispatching:

void DispatchPendingMessages(void)
{
    const DWORD uiTimeout = GetTickCount() + 10000;
    const HANDLE hEvent = CreateEvent(NULL, TRUE, FALSE, NULL);
    unsigned int counter = 0;
    if(hEvent)
    {
        for(;;)
        {
            MSG Message;
            while(PeekMessage(&Message, NULL, WM_NULL, WM_NULL, PM_REMOVE))
            {
                TranslateMessage(&Message);
                DispatchMessage(&Message);
            }
            const DWORD nWaitResult = MsgWaitForMultipleObjects(1, &hEvent, FALSE, 250, QS_ALLINPUT | QS_ALLPOSTMESSAGE);
            if((nWaitResult == WAIT_TIMEOUT) || (nWaitResult == WAIT_FAILED) || (GetTickCount() >= uiTimeout)) break;
        }
        CloseHandle(hEvent);
    }
}

//-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

static int TestProc(const TCHAR *pcDirectoryName, const TCHAR *pcFileName)
{
    int iSuccess = 0;

    IShellDispatch *pShellDispatch = NULL;
    Folder *pFolder = NULL; FolderItem *pItem = NULL;
    FolderItemVerbs *pVerbs = NULL;

    HRESULT hr = CoCreateInstance(CLSID_Shell, NULL, CLSCTX_INPROC_SERVER, IID_IShellDispatch, (void**)&pShellDispatch);
    if(FAILED(hr) || (pShellDispatch ==  NULL))
    {
        iSuccess = -3;
        return iSuccess;
    }

    variant_t vaDirectory(pcDirectoryName);
    hr = pShellDispatch->NameSpace(vaDirectory, &pFolder);
    if(FAILED(hr) || (pFolder == NULL))
    {
        iSuccess = -4;
        pShellDispatch->Release();
        return iSuccess;
    }

    variant_t vaFileName(pcFileName);
    hr = pFolder->ParseName(vaFileName, &pItem);
    if(FAILED(hr) || (pItem == NULL))
    {
        iSuccess = -5;
        pFolder->Release();
        pShellDispatch->Release();
        return iSuccess;
    }

    hr = pItem->Verbs(&pVerbs);
    if(FAILED(hr) || (pVerbs == NULL))
    {
        iSuccess = -6;
        pItem->Release();
        pFolder->Release();
        pShellDispatch->Release();
        return iSuccess;
    }

    /* Here we would do something with the FolderItemVerbs */

    pVerbs->Release(); pVerbs = NULL;
    pItem->Release(); pItem = NULL;
    pFolder->Release(); pFolder = NULL;
    pShellDispatch->Release(); pShellDispatch = NULL;

    iSuccess = 1;
    return iSuccess;
}

//-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

static unsigned __stdcall ThreadProc(void* pArguments)
{
    HRESULT hr = CoInitialize(NULL);
    if((hr == S_OK) || (hr == S_FALSE))
    {
        threadParam_t *params = (threadParam_t*) pArguments;
        params->returnValue = TestProc(params->pcDirectoryName, params->pcFileName);
        DispatchPendingMessages(); //This is required before CoUninitialize() to avoid crash with certain Shell Extensions !!!
        CoUninitialize();
    }
    else
    {
        if(threadParam_t *params = (threadParam_t*) pArguments)
        {
            params->returnValue = -10;
        }
    }

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Couldn't reproduce the crash with that code so far :-)

share|improve this answer
    
Nah, you haven't found it. Pumping a message loop for an STA thread is a hard requirement but it causes deadlock when you don't, not a crash. Your nemesis is CoFreeUnusedLibraries() and a buggy shell extension that unloads while it has a pending marshaling call. GetInterfaceFromGlobal() in your stack trace started that. Debugging your code, single stepping it, can cause CoFreeUnusedLibraries() to be called. Something you probably stopped doing when you found out it wasn't your code. Shell extensions are a bug factory, particularly the open source kind. –  Hans Passant Oct 23 '12 at 0:52
    
The shellex module is perhaps positive in DllCanUnloadNow within CoUninit call, and this causes DLL unload while worker thread is still active. The STA-compliant wait wins some time for this worker thread to finish and make the hosting DLL truely ready for unload... That is, wait does not reliably fix the bug, but it works around a set of issues related to buggy shell extensions. –  Roman R. Oct 23 '12 at 6:09
    
Hans Passant, so if running a "message pump" is a "hard" requirement, how would I do this "correctly" in my background/worker thread? If the thread is supposed to be in the message loop all the time, how do I do the actual work from the message loop? I mean, as soon as I call something from the loop, the loop gets "blocked" and we have a problem again, don't we? And when to "safely" exit the loop? BTW: I see a lot of code that calls CoInitialize(), does some work, and calls CoUninitialize(), so there never is any message pump. Is all that code "wrong" then? Regards –  MuldeR Oct 23 '12 at 11:46
    
BTW: What about using CoWaitForMultipleHandles() instead of MsgWaitForMultipleObjects()? Shouldn't that function automatically dispatch all messages that arrive while we are waiting? And what would be the right waiting flags to use? Regards –  MuldeR Oct 23 '12 at 12:41

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