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I read that that virtual destructors must be declared in classes that have virtual methods. I just cant understand why they must be declared virtual. I know why we need to have virtual destructors as from the following example. I just wanted to know why compilers dont manage virtual destructors for us. Is there something I need to know about working of virtual destructors ? The following example shows that if destructors are not declared virtual the destructors of derived class are not called why is that ?

class Base 
{
    // some virtual methods
public:
    Base()
    {std::cout << "Base Constructor\n";}
    ~Base()
    {std::cout << "Base De-structor\n";}

};

class Derived : public Base
{
public:
    Derived()
    {std::cout << "Der constructor\n";}
    ~Derived()
    { std::cout << "Der De-structor\n";}
} ;         
void main()
{

    Base *b = new Derived();
    delete b;
}
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5  
Perhaps you'll like Stroustrup's word. –  chris Oct 22 '12 at 20:17
    
I could see some utility in compilers detecting the presence of a virtual function and writing a warning when your destructor was not declared as such. –  Craig Wright Oct 22 '12 at 20:22
    
@CraigWright, -Weffc++ rings a bell, though that thing's too buggy to use all the time :/ –  chris Oct 22 '12 at 20:22
    
What do you mean by "manage virtual destructors for us?" Do you mean have destructors virtual by default, always virtual, virtual if it looks like that's what we want? –  bames53 Oct 22 '12 at 20:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I just wanted to know why compilers dont manage virtual destructors for us.

Because in C++, you pay for what you use. Having a virtual destructor by default involves the compiler adding a virtual table pointer to the class, which increases its size. This is not always desirable.

The following example shows that if destructors are not declared virtual the destructors of derived class are not called why is that ?

The example exibits undefined behavior. It's simply against the rules. The fact that not all destructors are called is just one possible manifestation. It could possibly crash.

Is there something I need to know about working of virtual destructors ?

Yes. They are required if you're deleting an object through a pointer to a base class. Otherwise it's undefined behavior.

5.3.5 Delete [expr.delete]

3) In the first alternative (delete object), if the static type of the object to be deleted is different from its dynamic type, the static type shall be a base class of the dynamic type of the object to be deleted and the static type shall have a virtual destructor or the behavior is undefined. In the second alternative (delete array) if the dynamic type of the object to be deleted differs from its static type, the behavior is undefined. (emphasis mine)

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@DavidRodríguez-dribeas the program has UB if you attempt to delete a derived object through a base class pointer. I can dig up the quote if you have any doubts. –  Luchian Grigore Oct 22 '12 at 20:29
    
3.8p4 if there is no explicit call to the destructor or if a delete-expression (5.3.5) is not used to release the storage, the destructor shall not be implicitly called and any program that depends on the side effects produced by the destructor has undefined behavior –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 22 '12 at 20:35
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas your statement is still false - "The program only exhibits undefined behavior if it depends on the side effects of the destructor of the most derived type." The "only" there makes it exclusive. The program has UB if <what you said> or if you attempt to delete. –  Luchian Grigore Oct 22 '12 at 20:36
    
You are right, the behavior is not undefined if delete is not called, but it is undefined to call delete through a base pointer if the destructor is not virtual. 5.3.5/3 –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 22 '12 at 20:38
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas exactly - and that's all I stated in the answer because that's the only case that applied here. :) –  Luchian Grigore Oct 22 '12 at 20:38

I read that that virtual destructors must be declared in classes that have virtual methods.

"must" is too strong a word: "should" fits much better into that advise.

I just wanted to know why compilers dont manage virtual destructors for us.

C++ designers tried to avoid compiler doing things that you did not ask it to do only under the most extreme circumstances. Language designers recognized that the decision to make a class polymorphic should rest with the designer of the program, so they refused to re-assign this responsibility to the compiler.

The following example shows that if destructors are not declared virtual the destructors of derived class are not called why is that?

Because your code is invalid: by declaring the destructor of Derived non-virtual you made a promise to never destroy Derived through a pointer to Base; your main breaks this promise, invoking undefined behavior.

Note that by merely declaring your b variable with the exact type you would have avoided the problem associated with the non-virtual destructor (link to ideone). However, this leads to a rather shaky design, so you should avoid inheritance hierarchies with virtual functions and non-virtual destructors.

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1  
I like the wording in the paragraph: Because your code is invalid: that sums it up very nicely. –  Loki Astari Oct 22 '12 at 20:36

I read that that virtual destructors must be declared in classes that have virtual methods.

Yes. But that is an oversimplification.
Its not that a class with virtual methods needs a virtual destructor. But the way a class with virtual methods is used means that it will usually need a virtual destructor. A virtual destructor is ONLY needed if you delete an object via a pointer to its base class. The problem is that when an object has virtually methods you are usually working with a pointer to its base class even though the actual object is slightly different.

I just cant understand why they must be declared virtual.

It's not that they must. As explained above. This is a result of the usual usage patterns.

I just wanted to know why compilers dont manage virtual destructors for us.

Because it is not always needed. And the ethos of C++ is you don't have to pay for something you don't need it. If the compiler always added virtual destructors to a class with virtual methods then I would have to pay the price of using a virtual destructor even in situations I can prove in my code base that I don't need it.

Is there something I need to know about working of virtual destructors ?

Just that there is a slight cost to using them.

if destructors are not declared virtual the destructors of derived class are not called why is that ?

That is why we have virtual destructors to cause this behavior. If you need this behavior you need to add virtual destructors. But there are cases were virtual destructors may not be required which allows the user of this method not to pay the price.

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