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I'm experiencing a really annoying bug that seems to only happen on Windows and OS X: the z-index of an element whose parent has fixed position doesn't work on Chrome! I converted my odd situation to a simple code:

html:

<div id="mask">
    &nbsp;
</div>

<div id="box">
    <div class="below-mask circle">
        should be below the mask
    </div>

    <div class="above-mask circle">
        should be above the mask
    </div>
</div>​

css:

body {
    font-family: Verdana;
    font-size: 9px;
    margin: 0px;
}

#box {
    position: fixed;
}

#mask {
    position: absolute;
    left: 0px;
    top: 0px;
    background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    z-index: 9998;
}

.circle {
    position: relative;
    background-color: rgba(255, 204, 0, 0.75);
    border-radius: 75px;
    line-height: 150px;
    margin: 50px;
    text-align: center;
    width: 150px;
    height: 150px;
}

.above-mask {
    z-index: 9999;
}

.below-mask {
    z-index: 9997;
}​

sandbox: http://jsfiddle.net/gibatronic/umbgp/

I tested on Internet Explorer 9, Firefox 15, Opera 12.02 and Safari 5.1.7 on OS X and Windows and all of them displayed as expected. I also tested on Ubuntu 12.10 and it worked just fine for every browser including Chrome! I even tested on Kindle 4 browser and it worked!

I wonder if anyone knows any kind of fix to workaround this issue!

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1  
actually, on ff 16.0.1 it does not display as expected as well... –  LorDex Oct 22 '12 at 20:28
    
thanks @LorDex! –  gibatronic Oct 22 '12 at 20:48
    
@LorDex in which OS did you tested? Everything is working fine for me on Ubuntu and Windows with Firefox 16.0.1! –  gibatronic Oct 23 '12 at 13:41

7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted

one800higgins's answer is along the right lines. The real answer is that on mobile WebKit and Chrome 22+, position: fixed always creates a new stacking context, even when z-index is auto. So the stacking context hierarchy looks like this:

  • document root (z-index 0)
    • #mask (z-index 9998)
    • #box (z-index 0)
      • .above-mask (z-index 9999)
      • .below-mask (z-index 9997)

That means that 9998 is never compared with 9999 or 9997 to determine stacking order. Instead, 9999 is compared with 9997 to determine which of .above-mask and .below-mask is further in front, and then once everything inside #box is stacked in that context, it's treated as a single layer at z-index 0 which gets stacked behind #mask at z-index 9998.

This also explains why @TheNextBillGates's answer of moving #mask inside #box works - because then #mask is in the same stacking context as .above-mask and .below-mask. I highly recommend the above link for more comprehensive details, and you should also see the announcement for the stacking change for fixed elements in Chrome.

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1  
Very good explanation and thanks for the link. This is not a bug as I've always thought it was ! You made my day. –  Eric MORAND Sep 30 '13 at 9:16

I just came across this bug, and its still happening in Google Chrome v26. I could set the z-index as high as I wanted to from code or Chrome's CSS editor and it made no difference (and the element's position was set to absolute). The same z-index setting was working as expected in Firefox and even IE8-IE10. When I switched the parent element from position:fixed to position:absolute then the child element's z-index worked fine in Chrome.

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Change or remove the position: fixed on #box, and you're set.

jsFiddle

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unfortunately does, because the #box div in my project is actually a sticky menu, that's why it has fixed position, and the idea of all this is to highlight an item from the menu in a guided tour. –  gibatronic Oct 22 '12 at 20:44
    
removing 'position:fixed' wont do any good, because mask div is semi-transparent. –  LorDex Oct 22 '12 at 20:49
    
Check the jsFiddle I posted... Removing position: fixed is all I did and it worked perfectly. Transparency has nothing to do with it... You can set them to solid colors and see for yourself. –  one800higgins Oct 22 '12 at 20:53
    
I'm sorry @one800higgins but it doesn't make any sense, if I set #box to be position relative or absolute it works just fine, why only fixed is cursed like that? –  gibatronic Oct 22 '12 at 21:01
    
@gibatronic I'm trying to figure that out too. I would think that it would behave the same between fixed and absolute elements, but for some reason making it a fixed element causes this behavior. –  one800higgins Oct 22 '12 at 21:04

If you move the #mask inside of the #box it works just fine.

<div id="box">
    <div id="mask">&nbsp;</div>
    <div class="below-mask circle">should be below the mask</div>
    <div class="above-mask circle">should be above the mask</div>
</div>

Here's a fiddle http://jsfiddle.net/TheNextBillGates/jKm4b/

Not sure why this is just yet.

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Assign a z-index to your fixed div. That should cause chrome to respect the z-index values for all it's children as well.

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The multiple z-index stacks is unfortunate and confusing in my opinion, however you may be able to solve this without changing your html structure if you raise the z-index of any of the target element's parents. Try to find a parent element that is a sibling of the troublesome element overlapping your content. Apply this styling:

position: relative; z-index: [# higher than overlapping element's z-index];

Your milage may vary depending on your project, however this solution worked for my project.

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Oh, i see where the problem is. the .below-mask circle actually lays under .mask div, but since .mask div has black background color with 50% opacity, that's why you can see the element below. Change your css to:

#mask {
    position: absolute;
    left: 0px;
    top: 0px;
    background-color: #7f7f7f;
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    z-index: 9998;
}

See THIS

share|improve this answer
    
sorry dude but you misunderstood the issue! the correct display is that "should be above the mask" circle should be above the mask and "should be below the mask" circle should be below the mask. –  gibatronic Oct 22 '12 at 20:41

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