Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I want to call some method on every 5 minutes, how can I do this?

public class Program
{
   static void Main(string[] args)
   {
      Console.WriteLine("*** calling MyMethod *** ");
      Console.ReadLine();
   }

   private MyMethod()
   {
     Console.WriteLine("*** Method is executed at {0} ***", DateTime.Now);
     Console.ReadLine();
   }
}
share|improve this question
7  
System.Threading.Timer – Kretab Chabawenizc Oct 22 '12 at 20:38
1  
or System.Timers.Timer - dotnetperls.com/timer – sinanakyazici Oct 22 '12 at 20:39
up vote 42 down vote accepted
var timer = new System.Threading.Timer((e) =>
{
    MyMethod();   
}, null, 0, TimeSpan.FromMinutes(5).TotalMilliseconds);
share|improve this answer
8  
Another way to set the interval is by passing in a timespan object. I think it's a little bit cleaner: Timespan.FromMinutes(5) – Michael Haren Oct 22 '12 at 20:41
1  
@MichaelHaren I didn't know that, that is very nice. Thank you! – asawyer Oct 22 '12 at 20:42
    
I think there's a problem with the timespan object because it's not the right type (as is), compared to just 0, 5 * 60 * 1000. Anyway, for me it generates an error. – amiregelz Oct 14 '13 at 13:12
3  
@asawyer Unfortunately your implementation gives a compile error. TotalMilliseconds returns a double while the timer expects integers or TimeSpan. I tried to update your answer to one that employs TimeSpan and throws out unnecessary bloat; however, you reverted it. – André Christoffer Andersen Feb 5 '14 at 23:09
1  
@AndréChristofferAndersen Change 0 in Time constructor to TimeSpan.Zero. Code works after this. – RredCat Dec 1 '15 at 14:07

I based this on @asawyer's answer. He doesn't seem to get a compile error, but some of us do. Here is a version which the C# compiler in Visual Studio 2010 will accept.

var timer = new System.Threading.Timer(
    e => MyMethod(),  
    null, 
    TimeSpan.Zero, 
    TimeSpan.FromMinutes(5));
share|improve this answer
    
How to stop this? – Muhammad Awais Jun 12 at 14:22

Use a Timer. Timer documentation.

share|improve this answer
while (true)
{
    Thread.Sleep(60 * 5 * 1000);
    Console.WriteLine("*** calling MyMethod *** ");
    MyMethod();
}
share|improve this answer
5  
A timer is a better fit. – Chuck Conway Oct 22 '12 at 20:41
    
isn't it inefficient to use thread.sleep??? – Mohsen Shakiba Apr 1 at 19:36

Example of using timers.

using system.timers;

constructor or main method()
{
    Timer t = new Timer(TimeSpan.FromMinutes(5).TotalMiliseconts); // set the time

    t.AutoReset = true;

    t.Elapsed += new System.Timers.ElapsedEventHandler(your_method);

    t.Start();

}

private void your_method(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
    messagebox.show("helloworld") // this called every 5 min

}
share|improve this answer

Start a timer in the constructor of your class. The interval is in milliseconds so 5*60 seconds = 300 seconds = 300000 milliseconds.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    System.Timers.Timer timer = new System.Timers.Timer();
    timer.Interval = 300000;
    timer.Elapsed += timer_Elapsed;
    timer.Start();
}

Then call GetData() in the timer_Elapsed event like this:

static void timer_Elapsed(object sender, System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
    //YourCode
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.