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Folder1/
    -fileA.txt
    -fileB.txt
    -fileC.txt

> mkdir Folder2/

> [copy command]

And now Folder2/ looks like:

Folder2/
    -fileA.txt
    -fileB.txt
    -fileC.txt   

How to make this happen? I have tried cp -r Folder1/ Folder2/ but I ended up with:

Folder2/
    Folder1/
        -fileA.txt
        -fileB.txt
        -fileC.txt

Which is close but not exactly what I wanted.

Thanks!

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closed as off topic by casperOne Oct 23 '12 at 11:52

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3 Answers 3

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Try this:

cp Folder1/* Folder2/
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1  
but this won't copy hidden files, right? –  Fabrizio Regini Jan 29 at 10:35
1  
Correct. cp -R will, but that'll recursively copy, so you may or may not want to use that. You could do cp Folder1/.* Folder2/ to copy only the hidden files. –  Geoff Jan 30 at 0:12
    
Note that this will fail if you are using "sudo" or an equivalent and the directory contains a lot of files. I get sudo: unable to execute /bin/cp: Argument list too long –  Nathan Osman 14 hours ago

Quite simple, with a * wildcard.

cp -r Folder1/* Folder2/

But according to your example recursion is not needed so the following will suffice:

cp Folder1/* Folder2/

EDIT:

Or skip the mkdir Folder2 part and just run:

cp -r Folder1 Folder2
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If ls | sort -k1.5 | head -8 > folder1 then how to do that ? –  Pooja Apr 4 '13 at 4:49

To make an exact copy, permissions, ownership, and all use "-a" with "cp". "-r" will copy the contents of the files but not necessarily keep other things the same.

cp -av Source/* Dest/

(make sure Dest/ exists first)

If you want to repeated update from one to the other or make sure you also copy all dotfiles, rsync is a great help:

rsync -av --delete Source/ Dest/

This is also "recoverable" in that you can restart it if you abort it while copying. I like "-v" because it lets you watch what is going on but you can omit it.

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what is the -v for? –  HattrickNZ Jun 23 at 0:53
    
verbose, just to watch what is going on. –  Brian White Jun 23 at 1:05

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