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I am attempting to sort an ArrayList based on the value of a long present within each object. After following various examples around the internet, I have come up with the following code but it is not sorting as desired (it seems to truncate parts of the object).

public static Comparator<Customer> compareSIN = 
         new Comparator<Customer>() {
            public int compare(Customer cust1, Customer other) {
               String sin1 = "" + cust1.sin;
               String sin2 = "" + other.sin;
               return sin1.compareTo(sin2);
            }
         };

Please advise me on what I am doing missing in the first snippet of code that is preventing me from sorting the objects properly.

Thanks!

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

From the title I assume Customer.sin is a long - and the problem is you are trying to compare them as Strings rather then by their numeric value.

(Example: 10000 is lexicographically smaller then 2 - so using Strings here is the fault)

You should use Long.compare() (Assuming java 7):

public static Comparator<Customer> compareSIN = 
         new Comparator<Customer>() {
            public int compare(Customer cust1, Customer other) {
               return Long.compare(cust1.sin,other.sin);
            }
         };
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Thanks, can you please clarify what the syntax would be for Long.compare()? –  mCode Oct 22 '12 at 22:50
    
Why use Long.compare() over a simple subtraction? Im curious. –  Jon Taylor Oct 22 '12 at 22:51
1  
@mCode: Sure, see edit –  amit Oct 22 '12 at 22:51
2  
Long subtraction wont work when the return value of the compareTo method is int. The compiler will complain about loss of precision. Makes sense because the subtracted value might overflow integer. –  Kal Oct 22 '12 at 23:04
1  
@JonTaylor: See Kal's insight on the reason why substraction is wrong. This is exactly the reason to prefer built in libraries when possible - someone already thought on whatever we don't. –  amit Oct 22 '12 at 23:11
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You do not actually need to use a compareTo() method inside your own compareTo() method.

The compare to states that it must return 0 if they are equal and negative or positive numbers for non equality.

For this reason you can compare two longs by returning the one subtracted from the other.

public int compare(Customer cust1, Customer other) {
           return cust1.sin - other.sin;
}

This will as you can see, return 0 if they are equal, negative if other.sin is greater than cust1.sin and positive if cust1.sin is greater than other.sin.

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I think he wants to compare them as String... if i'm not mistaken –  amphibient Oct 22 '12 at 22:50
    
I think he was converting to a string because it had a compareTo method available. From his title and description he wants to compare the long values. What would comparing the string representations achieve? –  Jon Taylor Oct 22 '12 at 22:51
    
nothing to my taste but i assumed he was converting to String on some kind of purpose –  amphibient Oct 22 '12 at 22:53
    
@foampile I had only converted to string because .compareTo does not work with long and for some reason, I didn't think of subtraction. –  mCode Oct 22 '12 at 23:08
    
@JonTaylor Thanks! –  mCode Oct 22 '12 at 23:09
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You compare Strings instead of longs.

So, imagine you want to compare : "10" and "5", outcome would be "10" < "5" whereas thinking that you're working with long, you expect to get 10 > 5 ...

That can explain your issue.

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