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If I have a C++ function declaration:

int func(const vector<int> a)

Would it always be beneficial to replace it with

int func(const vector<int> &a)

since the latter does not need to make a copy of a to pass into the function?

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6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In general, yes. You should always pass large objects by reference (or pass a pointer to them, especially if you are using C).

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Mostly it would be more efficient -- but if it happens that func needs to make its own copy of the vector and modify it destructively while it does whatever it does anyway, then you might as well save a few lines and let the language make the copy for you implicitly as a pass-by-value parameter. It is conceivable that the compiler might then be able to figure out that the copying can be omitted if the caller is not actually using its copy of the vector afterwards.

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It's not just 'saving a few lines', it's make the intent clear in the header (guaranteeing the caller that you won't mutate it). –  james.haggerty Oct 22 '12 at 23:46
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@james.haggerty: If that was all, the const ought to suffice. –  Henning Makholm Oct 22 '12 at 23:48
    
True, sorry :-) –  james.haggerty Oct 23 '12 at 3:26
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In terms of efficiency like you're thinking, almost always yes. There are times where (purportedly) this may be slower, typically with types that are fundamental or small:

// copy x? fits in register: fast
void foo(const int x);

// reference x? requires dereferencing on typical implementations: slow
void foo(const int& x); 

But with inlining this doesn't matter anyway, plus you can just type it by-value yourself; this only matters with generic template functions.

However it's important to note that your transformation may not always be valid, namely because your function gets its own copy of the data. Consider this simpler example:

void foo(const int x, int& y)
{
    y += x;
    y += x;
}

int v = 1;
foo(v, v); // results in v == 3

Make your transformation and you get:

void foo(const int& x, int& y)
{
    y += x;
    y += x;
}

int v = 1;
foo(v, v); // results in v == 4

Because even though you cannot write to x, it can be written to through other means. This is called aliasing. While probably not a concern with the example you've given (though global variables could still alias!), just be wary of the difference in principle.

Lastly, if you're going to make your own copy anyway, just do it in the parameter list; the compiler can optimize that for you, especially with C++11's rvalue references/move semantics.

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In short, yes. Since you can't modify a anyway, all your function body could do is make another copy, which you can just as well make from a const-reference.

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Some reasons I can imagine the pass by value could be more efficient:

  • It can be better paralellized. Because there's no aliasing. The original can change without affecting the value inside the function.
  • Better cache locality
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Correct. Passing a reference will avoid a copy. You should make use of references when there's a copy involved and you don't actually need one. (Either because you don't intent to modify the value, in which case operating on the original is fine and you'd use a const reference, or because you do want to modify the original rather than a copy of it, in which case you'd use a non-const reference.)

This isn't limited to function arguments of course. For example, look at this function:

std::string foo();

Most people would use that function in this way:

std::string result = foo();

However, if you're not modifying result, this is way better:

const std::string& result = foo();

No copy is being made. Also, contrary to pointers, a reference guarantees that the temporary returned by foo() stays valid and will not go out of scope (a pointer to a temporary is dangerous, while a reference to a temporary is perfectly safe.)

The C++-11 standard solves this problem by using move semantics, but most existing code doesn't make use of this new feature yet, so using references wherever possible is a good habit to get into.

Also, note that you have to be careful about temporary lifetimes when binding temporaries to references, e.g.:

const int& f(const int& x)
{ return x; }

const int& y = f(23);
int z = y; /* OOPS */

The point being that the lifetime of the temporary int with value 23 doesn't extend beyond the end of the expression binding f(23) to y, so the attempt to assign y to z results in undefined behavior (due to the dangling reference).

Note that when you're dealing with POD types (Plain Old Data), like int or char, you don't win anything by avoiding a copy. Usually a reference is just as big as an int or long int (usually as big as a pointer), so copying an int by reference is the same as copying the int itself.

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I would change that to read you should make use of references when you *don't* want avoid copying *or* when you want to modify a reference. Sometimes, you do want the copy to occur (Like in an assignment operator with an appropriately written copy constructor) –  Mike Bantegui Oct 23 '12 at 0:02
    
@MikeBantegui Good point. I updated the answer with (hopefully) clearer phrasing. –  Nikos C. Oct 23 '12 at 0:09
    
No need for move semantics, C++98 solves this problem with copy elision. –  Benjamin Lindley Oct 23 '12 at 0:11
    
Pre-C++-11, many compilers implemented named return value optimisation for this sort of thing, so the copy may not actually happen in practice anyway. –  Stuart Golodetz Oct 23 '12 at 0:12
1  
Also, note that you have to be careful about temporary lifetimes when binding temporaries to references, e.g. const int& f(const int& x) { return x; } const int& y = f(23); int z = y; /* OOPS */. The point being that the lifetime of the temporary int with value 23 doesn't extend beyond the end of the expression binding f(23) to y, so the attempt to assign y to z results in undefined behaviour (due to the dangling reference). –  Stuart Golodetz Oct 23 '12 at 0:17
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