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def evaluatePoly(poly, x):
    '''
    Computes the value of a polynomial function at given value x. Returns that
    value as a float.

    poly: list of numbers, length > 0
    x: number
    returns: float
    '''
    for n in range(len(poly)):
        poly[n] = (poly[n]) * (x**n)

    return float(sum(poly[:]))

def computeDeriv(poly):
    '''
    Computes and returns the derivative of a polynomial function as a list of
    floats. If the derivative is 0, returns [0.0].

    poly: list of numbers, length > 0
    returns: list of numbers (floats)

    >>> print computeDeriv([-13.39, 0.0, 17.5, 3.0, 1.0])
    [0.0, 35.0, 9.0, 4.0]
    >>> print computeDeriv([6, 1, 3, 0])
    [1.0, 6.0, 0.0]
    >>> print computeDeriv([20])
    [0.0]

    '''
    if len(poly) == 1:
        poly = [0.0]
        return poly
    for m in range(len(poly)):
        poly[m] = float(m) * poly[m]
    return poly[1:]

def computeRoot(poly, x_0, epsilon):
    '''
    Uses Newton's method to find and return a root of a polynomial function.
    Returns a list containing the root and the number of iterations required
    to get to the root.

    poly: list of numbers, length > 1.
         Represents a polynomial function containing at least one real root.
         The derivative of this polynomial function at x_0 is not 0.
    x_0: float
    epsilon: float > 0
    returns: list [float, int]

    >>> print computeRoot([-13.39, 0.0, 17.5, 3.0, 1.0], 0.1,  .0001)
    [0.806790753796352, 7]
    >>> print computeRoot([1, 9, 8], -3, .01)
    [-1.0000079170005467, 5]
    >>> print computeRoot([1, -1, 1, -1], 2, .001)
    [1.0002210630197605, 4]
    '''
    x = x_0
    iter = 0
    list = []
    polyStart = poly[:]
    while abs(evaluatePoly(poly, x)) >= epsilon:
        poly = polyStart[:]
        l = evaluatePoly(poly,x)
        if abs(l) < epsilon:
            list.append(x)
            list.append(iter)
            return list
        else:
            poly = polyStart[:]
            d = computeDeriv(poly)
            dn = evaluatePoly(d, x)
            x = (x - (l/dn))
            iter = iter + 1
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by om-nom-nom, Brendan Long, Demian Brecht, Jon Clements, ρяσѕρєя K Oct 23 '12 at 5:11

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
I see code but I don't see a question. –  Brendan Long Oct 23 '12 at 0:35
    
You may wish to ask this on codereview.stackexchange.com as it's not really a question with a specific problem –  Jon Clements Oct 23 '12 at 0:42
    
its for homework. And the autochecker is giving me the result of None. But, python is giving me all the right answers. Why would the autochecker result in None? –  Kevin Oct 23 '12 at 0:48
    
@Kevin You should put as much information about that as possible in the actual question. Which function? What inputs? –  Brendan Long Oct 23 '12 at 0:50
    
Sorry, first time doing this. For the computeRoot function. I am getting the proper answers to my test values. The first two functions work perfect. My homework is submitted online and it goes through an auto-checker. The online autochecker is returning a 'None' value on the computeRoot function. But, when I run it on python 2 and 3 it returns me a proper list. So, I don't know if the autochecker is broken or my code is broken. –  Kevin Oct 23 '12 at 0:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I assume you mean this function is returning None on some particular input:

def computeRoot(poly, x_0, epsilon):
    x = x_0
    iter = 0
    list = []
    polyStart = poly[:]
    while abs(evaluatePoly(poly, x)) >= epsilon:
        poly = polyStart[:]
        l = evaluatePoly(poly,x)
        if abs(l) < epsilon:
            list.append(x)
            list.append(iter)
            return list
        else:
            poly = polyStart[:]
            d = computeDeriv(poly)
            dn = evaluatePoly(d, x)
            x = (x - (l/dn))
            iter = iter + 1

How do I know? Because there's only one return, and it's not at the end of the function. If abs(evaluatePoly(poly, x)) >= epsilon is False, then the while loop will end, and there's nothing after it, so the function ends and returns None by default (any function which doesn't explicitly return returns None).

So, you need to figure out what the correct return value is in that situation and add a return statement and the end of the function.

share|improve this answer
    
This is why I added the if loop. The while loop was infinite and I couldn't figure out why. It should of stopped before I through the if statement in. I know its redundant, but I couldnt figure out why the while loop didnt stop at less than epsilon but the for loop does. –  Kevin Oct 23 '12 at 1:00
    
Closing the while loop worked for the checker. I closed out the while loop with.. list.append(x) list.append(iter) return list. Thanks Brendan. –  Kevin Oct 23 '12 at 1:07
    
@Kevin What if they intentionally used a value where your first guess is correct? You'd never enter the while loop, so your inner checks wouldn't help. –  Brendan Long Oct 23 '12 at 1:08
    
They list the test values they use and the results given for like 15 tests. So, originally they were all coming up none. But, when I tested the values on Python they worked. –  Kevin Oct 23 '12 at 1:10
    
@Kevin I think you can fix your while by just moving the copy into it: while abs(evaluatePoly(poly[:], x)) >= epsilon, since copying the list ([:]) is the only difference. –  Brendan Long Oct 23 '12 at 1:12

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