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I'm trying to use Perl to parse a file that has repeating sections like this:

System:      server1.domain.com
Start Time:  20121021T01:00:56
Stop Time:   20121021T01:00:56
Return Code: 0

Output
------
user1
user2
user3

##############################

System:      server2.domain.com
Start Time:  20121021T01:00:56
Stop Time:   20121021T01:00:56
Return Code: 0

Output
------
user1
user4
user5
user6

I'm able to set the input record separator to "##############################" which will give me each block as a separate record.

But I need to be able to populate a hash with the usernames as keys for each server.

What's the best way to accomplish this?

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should look into Perl references.

In Perl pre release 5.0, you had three types of data structures, and you could only store scalar data in them. For example, I could have a hash, but each value of the hash could be a string or number.

Perl 5.0 introduced references. A reference is a piece of data that points to another data structure. For example, you could have a hash which represents the servers. Each member of the hash points to another hash that contains users (or a list of users if you'd like).

For example, you have a hash that looks like this:

$system{server1.domain.com}  --->  $anon_array[0] = "user1"
                                   $anon_array[1] = "user2"
                                   $anon_array[2] = "user3"

$system{server2.domain.com}  ----> $another_anon_array[0] = "user1"
                                   $another_anon_array[1] = "user2"
                                   $another_anon_array[2] = "user3"
                                   $another_anon_array[3] = "user4"

You can see in the above that the key of your %system hash actually points to some array in memory that contains the list of users. These arrays don't have a name such as @foo or @bar. The only way you can access them is though your %system hash. Thus, they're known as anonymous arrays.

To create a reference, you put a backslash in front of the variable:

$my_reference = \%my_hash

Now, $my_reference points to the members of the hash %my_hash. If I want to make the reference into a hash again, I precede it with the hash sigil (the %):

%bar = %{$my_reference};

You can use the -> syntax to show that something points to a reference:

$foo->[0];   Points to the first member of an anonymous array.

$bar = [];    #Sets $bar to be a reference to an anonymous array
$foo = {};    #Sets $foo to be a reference to an anonymous hash.

Now, the real fun can begin! Instead of storing individual values, you can now store whole data structures.

Imagine something like this:

my %system;   #Normal hash keyed by domain name

$system{server1} = {};  # This points to an anonymous hash!
$system{server1}->{START}  = "20121021T01:00:56";
$system{server1}->{STOP}   = "20121021T01:00:56";
$system{server1}->{RETURN} = 0;
$system{server1}->{USERS} = [];  #This hash entry points to an anonymous array
$system{server1}->{USERS}->[0] = "user1";
$system{server1}->{USERS}->[1] = "user2";
$system{server1}->{USERS}->[2] = "user3";

And so on with server2. You have one hash %system that is keyed by the domain name. Each domain in your %system hash has a START time a STOP time, a RETURN value, an a list of USERS on that system. What is the start time for server1? It's $system{server1}->{START}. What is the list of users on system2? It's @{ $system{server2}->{USERS} }(a dereference of the array stored in $system{server2}->{USERS}).

It takes some getting use to this new way of thinking, but you can see that it helps keep your data together as a single structure.

Of course, with complex data structures comes problems keeping it straight. For example:

use strict;
use warnings;

my %server;
$servre{domain1} = "10.10.1.20";

Will fail because I never declared $servre. However:

use strict;
use warnings;
my $hash = {};
$hash->{SERVRE}->{domain1} = "10.10.1.20";

Will work just fine. In this case, SERVRE is a key to a hash reference and not a variable. The use strict; pragma won't detect my poor spelling in this case. This leads you to the next step: Object Oriented Perl. However, first understand these new complex data structures and how they work. After you get more comfortable using them in your programs, you can start looking into how object oriented programming will help tame the mess they cause.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for taking time for explanations – Gilles Quenot Oct 23 '12 at 2:57

Try doing this :

use strict; use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;          # one of the top 5 modules you should know

my $hash_of_hashes = {};   # a reference to a void HASH

my $current;

while (<>) {
    chomp;
    if (/^System:\s+(.+)/) {
        $current = $1;
    }
    elsif (/^([^:]+):(.+)/) {
        $hash_of_hashes->{$current}->{$1} = $2;
    }
}

print Dumper $hash_of_hashes; # Dumper is a function of Data::Dumper module
# it prints all the data structure in a human readable way

To use it :

perl script.pl input_file.txt

NOTE

I make the assumption that System: line is all the time matching the first line of the current host.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, Dumper prints in a computer readable way. It just so happens that we humans also understand it. It is possible to load a Data::Dumper output file directly into perl. – TLP Oct 23 '12 at 13:08

A fun problem, which makes me want to use paragraph mode. Using ####... as input record separator is an idea, surely, but it is a bit wonky and not so flexible. For example, $/ must be literal, meaning you have to have the exact number of characters.

If you can rely on double newlines as demonstrated in your input, paragraph mode will read each "set" in two parts, then the ####... delimiter as an easily discarded third part, and also the signal to start a new data set. Also, in this way, we have easier access to the "user" part, which may be somewhat random and its only determining feature being that it is preceded by the header "Output\n------".

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

$/ = "";                             # use paragraph mode
my @data = [];                       # first element must be array ref
while (<DATA>) {
    unless (/^#+\s*$/) {             # if not delimiter
        push @{ $data[-1] }, $_;     # save data in the arrays last element
    } else {
        push @data, [];              # start new array (which becomes the last)
    }
}
my %hash;
for (@data) {
    my ($sys, $out) = @$_;                  # $_ is an array ref w two elements
    my ($server) = $sys =~ /System:\s*(\S+)/;   # extract server name
    my @users = split /\n+/, $out;          # easy extraction of users
    splice @users, 0, 2;                    # remove header
    $hash{$server}{$_} = undef for @users;  # add key w undef value
}

print Dumper \%hash;
__DATA__
System:      server1.domain.com
Start Time:  20121021T01:00:56
Stop Time:   20121021T01:00:56
Return Code: 0

Output
------
user1
user2
user3

##############################

System:      server2.domain.com
Start Time:  20121021T01:00:56
Stop Time:   20121021T01:00:56
Return Code: 0

Output
------
user1
user4
user5
user6

Output:

$VAR1 = {
          'server1.domain.com' => {
                                    'user1' => undef,
                                    'user3' => undef,
                                    'user2' => undef
                                  },
          'server2.domain.com' => {
                                    'user5' => undef,
                                    'user1' => undef,
                                    'user4' => undef,
                                    'user6' => undef
                                  }
        };

Some notes about the finer points:

  • $data[-1] is the same as $data[$#data], I just think it looks a bit more readable.
  • Pushing an empty array ref onto @data means we start collecting a new set. This works in conjunction with the note above.
  • Saving the data in a two-dimensional array saves us some trouble in separating the "can-be-unpredictable" user names from the other data.
  • Splitting the Output block on multiple newlines strips our data of any troublesome trailing newlines, which is handy, since chomp only strips double newlines in paragraph mode (unless we change $/ again).
  • Adding undef as a value to the user name keys is merely a placeholder for any other value you may wish to put there.
  • Changing <DATA> to <>, and replacing the Dumper output will allow you to use file name args, or stdin with the script. These features are only for demonstration. Usage would be:

some_command | perl script.pl > output.txt
perl script.pl input.txt > output.txt
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