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class Code
{
public:
  Code();
  //string decode(vector< string> message);
private:
  //vector<string> codewords;
  //vector<char> alpha;
  char vector<char>  alphacode();
  string vector<string>  morsecode();
  //char decode(string c);

};

Code::Code()
{

}

string Code::vector<string> morsecode()
{
 vector<string> temp(28);
 temp[0] =".-";
 temp[1] ="-...";
 temp[2] ="-.-.";
 temp[3] ="-..";
 temp[4] =".";
 temp[5] ="..-.";
 temp[6] ="--.";
 temp[7] ="....";
 temp[8] ="..";
 temp[9] =".---";
 temp[10] ="-.-";
 temp[11] =".-..";
 temp[12] ="--";
 temp[13] ="-.";
 temp[14] ="---";
 temp[15] =".--.";
 temp[16] ="--.--";
 temp[17] =".-.";
 temp[18] ="...";
 temp[19] ="-";
 temp[20] ="..-";
 temp[21] ="...-";
 temp[22] =".--";
 temp[23] ="-..-";
 temp[24] ="-.--";
 temp[25] ="--..";
 temp[26] =".......";
 temp[27] ="x";
 return temp;
}

char Code::vector<char> alphacode()
{
 vector<char> temp;
 for (char c='A'; c<='Z'; c++)
      temp.push_back(c);
 temp.push_back(' ');
 temp.push_back('.');
 return temp;
}

int main()
{

return 0;
}

This is the code I have so far but I don't know if the syntax for my vector classes is correct. Also how would I go about accessing the vectors inside the int main() portion of my code. Sorry first quarter of c++ still very new to all this.

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1  
Your commented code of member function declarations is correct. Why do you think they are wrong ? –  Mahesh Oct 23 '12 at 1:12
    
The easiest way to check your syntax in C++ is to run the compiler and see if it outputs any errors. –  Brendan Long Oct 23 '12 at 1:19
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2 Answers

char vector<char>  alphacode();
string vector<string>  morsecode();

The return type of the member functions is wrong. char, vector<char> are two different types and you cannot use both. From the code, it seems you need vector<char>, vector<string>.

vector<string> Code::morsecode()
{
    // ...
}


vector<char> Code::alphacode()
{
    // ...
}
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First, you need return a vector type

vector<char>  Code::alphacode()
{
    //
}

vector<string>  Code::morsecode()
{
    //
}

Second, accessing vectors, an iterator is a good choice:

int main()
{
    Code c;
    vector<string> strVector = c.morsecode();
    vector<string>::iterator it = strVector.begin();
    for (; it != strVector.end(); ++it) {
        // accessing every single string inside this vector by dereference *it eg.
        cout << *it << endl;
    }
}

Run the code, check the result and you will get it :P

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