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Ok, I've looked all over for a solution for this but so far I'm unable to find anything related to what I need to accomplish.

What I need is very simple as far as logic goes.

I have a nav bar like this one:

<nav>
    <ul>
       <li><a href="download.shtml">Download</a></li>
       <li><a href="documentation.shtml">Documentation</a></li>
       <li><a href="contact.shtml">Contact</a></li>
       <li><a href="about.shtml">About</a></li>
    </ul>
</nav>

And the URLs of the site are straightforward:

http://domain.net/download.shtml
http://domain.net/documentation.shtml
http://domain.net/contact.shtml
http://domain.net/about.shtml

Question:

How can I detect which page/URL I'm on and add a class of .active to the corresponding nav item?

The end result would be, for example if I'm in the Download page:

<nav>
    <ul>
       <li><a href="download.shtml" class="active">Download</a></li>
       <li><a href="documentation.shtml">Documentation</a></li>
       <li><a href="contact.shtml">Contact</a></li>
       <li><a href="about.shtml">About</a></li>
    </ul>
</nav>

Thanks in advance for any help on this matter.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can try this, by checking anchor href indexOf in location.href

$(function(){
    $.each($("nav a"), function(){
       var self = $(this);
       if(location.href.indexOf(self.prop('href'))>-1){
           self.addClass('active');
           //self.parent().siblings().find('a').removeClass('active');
       }
    });

});
share|improve this answer
    
sibling() is actually siblings() and in this case the anchors have no siblings, instead it's the <li />s that are siblings. You won't need to remove the class however because the classes won't persist between page loads. –  Marko Oct 23 '12 at 3:55
    
@Marko, thanks to correct me. I have updated the answer. –  Yograj Gupta Oct 23 '12 at 3:56
    
No probs, good answer! +1 –  Marko Oct 23 '12 at 3:57
    
P.S. You can run .each() directly after the selectors, so $("nav a").each(function() {}). A little bit easier to read in my mind but could be a preference ;) –  Marko Oct 23 '12 at 3:58
    
Nice answer! +1 –  rlay3 Oct 23 '12 at 3:59

You can use window.location.pathname if your urls are that simple. For example:

$(function(){
  $('nav a').each(function(){
    if( $(this).attr('href') === window.location.pathname.substring(1) ){
      $(this).addClass('active');
    }
  });
});

Working example: http://jsbin.com/akevin/1/edit

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Matthew but your suggestion didn't work. Thanks again. –  ricardozea Oct 23 '12 at 4:08
    
That's odd. Did it throw any errors? It works for me when I test it... –  Matthew Blancarte Oct 23 '12 at 4:10
    
No errors, it just doesn't add the class active. –  ricardozea Oct 24 '12 at 4:41
    
Can you link me to the page you're testing it on? I'd like to verify. –  Matthew Blancarte Oct 24 '12 at 4:50
    
@Ricardo Here's a working example: jsbin.com/akevin/1/edit –  Matthew Blancarte Oct 24 '12 at 4:55

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