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Hey guys I've been using c# and events alot lately but I'm just starting to create my own events and use them. I'm a little confused on why to use the event keyword, I got the same result by only using delegates.

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    ServerConnection connection = new ServerConnection();

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        connection.ref = new del(MethOne);
        connection.ref += new del(MethTwo);
    }

    public void MethOne(object message)
    {
        MessageBox.Show((string)message);
    }

    public void MethTwo(object message)
    {
        MessageBox.Show((string)message);
    }

}


public delegate void del(string message);



public class ServerConnection
{
    private TcpListener tcpListener;
    public del ref;

    private List<NetworkStream> clientList = new List<NetworkStream>();

    public ServerConnection()
    {
        this.tcpListener = new TcpListener(IPAddress.Any, 3000);
        ThreadStart startListening = new ThreadStart(ListenForClients);
        Thread startThread = new Thread(startListening);
        startThread.Start();
    }


    public void ListenForClients()
    {
        tcpListener.Start();
        ParameterizedThreadStart handleClient = new ParameterizedThreadStart(HandleClient);

        while (true)
        {
            TcpClient newClient = tcpListener.AcceptTcpClient();
            Thread handleClientThread = new Thread(handleClient);
            handleClientThread.Start(newClient);
        }
    }


    public void HandleClient(object newClient)
    {
        NetworkStream clientStream = ((TcpClient)newClient).GetStream();
        clientList.Add(clientStream);

        BinaryFormatter formatter = new BinaryFormatter();
        string message;

        while (true)
        {
            message = (string)formatter.Deserialize(clientStream);
            ref((string)message);
        }
    }
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2  
Oh my... this seems to be a reasonable question. Why downvote? Why closing it? –  Miguel Angelo Oct 23 '12 at 4:04

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The event keyword lets you specify add and remove operations inline with the declaration.

private Action _myEvent;

public event Action MyEvent
{
    add
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Listener added!");
        _myEvent += value;
    }
    remove
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Listener removed!");
        _myEvent -= value;
    }
}
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Have a look at

C# events vs. delegates

the event keyword is a modifier for a delegate declaration that allows it to be included in an interface, constraints it invocation from within the class that declares it, provides it with a pair of customizable accessors (add and remove) and forces the signature of the delegate (when used within the .NET framework).

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Oh, yeah! The add/remove methods. Forgot about that! –  Miguel Angelo Oct 23 '12 at 3:59

The purpose is to identify what is an event, and what is just a callback.

Both seems to be the same thing, but the meaning is different.

Also Visual Studio places different icons to indicate events.

If I remember well, it the early days of C#, delegates didn't support this:

this.mydelegatefield += somethingHere;

Only events... but may be it is only my imagination.

EDIT

Just not to be missleading... there is the difference of add/remove methods. I place this after the other answers (since I forgot about this). So, credit is not mine.

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Event is just a sugarcoat. 3 things happen when you define an event.

Simple EG:

public event EventHandler alarm;

Sample compiler output

private EventHandler alarm

public void add_alarm(EventHandler value)
{
}

public void remove_alarm(EventHandler value)
{
}

Notice private in contrast to your public del me; Public accessors may cause problems. Also, using get and set is a better pattern

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events can be compared to properties of your class.

  • Properties are interfaces to your MemberField/Object states.
  • Similarly event is an interface to the underlying delegate.

you can still achieve the endresult without event.But you lose encapsulation without events.

A non protected delegate can be prone to abuse.

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