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I have a string, dictionary in the form:

('The puppy likes flowers',
 {'laughter': (8.5, 0.9313),
  'flowers': (7.88, 1.1718),
  'the': (4.98, 0.9145),
  'puppy': (7.58, 1.4581),
  'died': (1.56, 1.198),
  'laugh': (9.5, 0.1),
  'flow': (2.3, 0.51),
  'likes':(5.9, 0.032),
  'like':(6.5, 0.021)    
   }
  )

Each parentheses is a tuple which corresponds to (score, standard deviation). I'm taking the average of just the first integer in each tuple. I've tried this:

def score(string, d):
    if len(string) == 0:
        return 0
    string = string.lower()
    included = [d[word][0]for word in d if word in string]
    return sum(included) / len(included)

When I run:

print score ('The puppy likes flower', {'laughter': (8.5, 0.9313), 'flower': 
(7.88, 1.1718), 'the':(4.98, 0.9145), 'puppy':(7.58, 1.4581), 
'died':(1.56, 1.198),'laugh': (9.5, 0.1),'flow': (2.3, 0.51)})

I should get the average of only 'the', 'puppy', 'likes' and 'flowers': 4.98 + 7.88 + 5.9 + 7.58 / 4 but this running function also includes 'like' and 'flow' : 4.98 + 7.88 + 5.9 + + 7.58 + 6.5 + 2.3 / 6.

share|improve this question
    
A few points to clarify for your question [1] you have a tuple, [2] string is a bad name for a variable (its the name of a built-in) and [3] if len(string) == 0: can be simplified to if not len(string): –  Burhan Khalid Oct 23 '12 at 4:56
    
You don't even have to check the length. Python does that for you, simply use if not string: return None –  Raunak Agarwal Oct 23 '12 at 5:16
    

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First off using the variable string is not a great idea ... but its OK here ... you have a flaw in the logic ... the following works

def avg(l):
    if l:
        return sum(l)/len(l)
    return 0

def score(s, d):
    return avg([d.get(x,[0])[0] for x in s.lower().split()])

This will add a 0 for pieces of the string s that are not in d ... if you wanted to ignore them use the following instead

def score(s, d):
    return avg([d[x][0] for x in s.lower().split() if x in d])
share|improve this answer
    
What if x is not in the dictionary? –  Robert Smith Oct 23 '12 at 5:14
    
There fixed if x is not in d. –  Pykler Oct 23 '12 at 5:17
1  
Interesting way to fix it. Good. –  Robert Smith Oct 23 '12 at 5:23
    
Actually that adds a zero in the average which maybe wrong but the requirements did not talk about that case –  Pykler Oct 23 '12 at 5:26
    
I know. That's why I said interesting. I don't think it creates any issues, though. –  Robert Smith Oct 23 '12 at 5:27

You should split the string first:

splited_string = string.split()
included = [d[word][0]for word in d if word in splited_string]
share|improve this answer

You can get this part in the function below, but I decided to clean your tuple a bit:

tuple = ('The puppy likes flowers',
 {'laughter': (8.5, 0.9313),
  'flowers': (7.88, 1.1718),
  'the': (4.98, 0.9145),
  'puppy': (7.58, 1.4581),
  'died': (1.56, 1.198),
  'laugh': (9.5, 0.1),
  'flow': (2.3, 0.51),
  'likes':(5.9, 0.032),
  'like':(6.5, 0.021)    
   }
  )

string = tuple[0]
dict = tuple[1]

Now defining our function:

def score(string, dict):
    s = 0
    n = 0
    for each in string.lower().split(' '):
       if each in dict.keys():
          s += dict[each][0]
          n += 1
    average = s/n
    return average

In your case:

In [43]: string
Out[43]: 'The puppy likes flowers'

In [44]: dict
Out[44]: 
{'died': (1.56, 1.198),
 'flow': (2.3, 0.51),
 'flowers': (7.88, 1.1718),
 'laugh': (9.5, 0.1),
 'laughter': (8.5, 0.9313),
 'like': (6.5, 0.021),
 'likes': (5.9, 0.032),
 'puppy': (7.58, 1.4581),
 'the': (4.98, 0.9145)}

Evaluating the function:

In [45]: score(string, dict)
Out[45]: 6.585
share|improve this answer
1  
Wow see the note at the top of my answer ... you are super overriding python builtin variables/types –  Pykler Oct 23 '12 at 5:14
    
I didn't want to change all the variables so it would be easy to understand to OP however you're right, it needs to have other variable names. By the way, the addition of tuple and dict was intended to be humorous. –  Robert Smith Oct 23 '12 at 5:16

Instead of using python's 'in' operation try to use == That is, Edited:

string = string.split(' ') #Returns a list of word

included = [d[word][0]for word in d if word == string]
share|improve this answer
    
The word is part of the string not the whole thing –  Pykler Oct 23 '12 at 5:22
    
Also in wouldn't work either since it will allow partial matches. –  Pykler Oct 23 '12 at 5:23
    
Thanks for noticing it...I totally forgot to split the string :) –  Raunak Agarwal Oct 23 '12 at 5:26

Like the other answers so far, this answer looks up in the dictionary the scores for words split from the input string, which is different than what your example code does, which is to find dictionary words as parts of the input string and add up their scores. Also, the logic of this answer is similar to that of some of the other answers, but is expressed more compactly by using python's built-in filter function. The output of the program shown below is 6.585, 6.15333333333, None, 6.032 on four lines.

w={'puppy': (7.58, 1.4581), 'likes': (5.9, 0.032), 'laugh': (9.5, 0.1), 'flow': (2.3, 0.51), 'the': (4.98, 0.9145), 'flowers': (7.88, 1.1718), 'laughter': (8.5, 0.9313), 'died': (1.56, 1.198), 'like': (6.5, 0.021)}

def score(s, d):
    v = [d[a][0] for a in filter(lambda x: x in d, s.lower().split())]
    return sum(v)/len(v) if len(v) else None

print score('the puppy likes flowers', w)
print score('the puppy likes flower', w)
print score('short stuff', w)
print score('the flowers flow like laughter', w)
share|improve this answer

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