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var myButton = document.getElementsByTagName("input");

myButton[0].onclick = function() {
  if(ansArray[0] == 'a')
    myButton[0].style.backgroundColor = "green";
  else
    myButton[0].style.backgroundColor = "red";
}

myButton[1].onclick = function() {
  if(ansArray[0] == 'b')
    myButton[1].style.backgroundColor = "green";
  else
    myButton[1].style.backgroundColor = "red";
}

onclick function not working in my above example(IE9), but they work fine in Chrome and Firefox.

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3  
Are there any other errors on the page which prevent this code from being executed properly? –  Seth Battin Oct 23 '12 at 5:19
    
skipping semicolons ;... really not a good idea –  Alvin Wong Oct 23 '12 at 5:20
1  
@AlvinWong not strictly a bad idea either. Just be careful with lines that start with ( and a few other corner cases, and you're good to go. –  alpha123 Oct 23 '12 at 5:24
    
@alpha123 my habit, is to add ; to the end of every assignments and function calls, even for inline functions, because they always make the code much clearer, prevents some errors and follow my habit writing most "C-style" languages –  Alvin Wong Oct 23 '12 at 5:29
    
@AlvinWong I disagree with them making the code any cleaner, but I'm certainly not against semicolons; actually I use them in JS most of the time for the same reason you do: habit from other C-like languages. –  alpha123 Oct 23 '12 at 5:31
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2 Answers

The issue is that your DOM is not yet loaded when you are trying to access the buttons. Wrap your onclick handlers in window.load and everything should work fine:

window.onload = function () {
    var myButton = document.getElementsByTagName("input");

    myButton[0].onclick = function() {
        if(ansArray[0] == 'a') {
            myButton[0].style.backgroundColor = "green";
        } else {
            myButton[0].style.backgroundColor = "red";
        }
    }

    myButton[1].onclick = function() {
        if(ansArray[0] == 'b') {
            myButton[1].style.backgroundColor = "green";
        } else {
            myButton[1].style.backgroundColor = "red";
        }
    }
}

I am actually surprised this works under Webkit and Mozilla. I have created a small demo fiddle. In all cases, in all browsers the object comes out as null before load, unless the script block is after the element you are accessing inside the body.

Notice though that there is a difference in how getElementsByTagName reacts inside different browsers, it is different than getElementById: fiddle

Another alternative would be to not wait for window.onload would be to wait for document.body because window.onload happens after all content including images is loaded.

function Start() {
    if (document.body) {
        var myButton = document.getElementsByTagName("input");

        myButton[0].onclick = function() {
            if(ansArray[0] == 'a') {
                myButton[0].style.backgroundColor = "green";
            } else {
                myButton[0].style.backgroundColor = "red";
            }
        }

        myButton[1].onclick = function() {
            if(ansArray[0] == 'b') {
                myButton[1].style.backgroundColor = "green";
            } else {
                myButton[1].style.backgroundColor = "red";
            }
        }
    }
}

setInterval(Start, 50); // 50 ms is a small enough interval to retry
share|improve this answer
    
"The issue is that in IE your DOM is not yet loaded" - Why is that not also a problem in Chrome and FF? –  nnnnnn Oct 23 '12 at 6:08
    
@nnnnnn I have included a small demo –  Konstantin D - Infragistics Oct 23 '12 at 7:09
    
Your code works, I have seen it, but mine one fails to execute the event handler –  user1767304 Oct 23 '12 at 15:44
    
@user1767304 Yeah the fiddle examples I have posted are to show you why that's happening. –  Konstantin D - Infragistics Oct 23 '12 at 15:47
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Same answer I used here Javascript onclick functions do not work should apply.

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The buttons are created above the code segment given, the myButton array shows its langth, ansArray also shows contents. The given code is part of a number of alike functions for the entire myButton array. –  user1767304 Oct 23 '12 at 14:47
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