Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
def test(name):
    print "name:", name

func = test
func("testing") # it works, as I know that the function test accepts one parameter.

My question is, what if "test" has varying number of arguments depending on the scenario and how "func" knows how many number of arguments to pass and what are those arguments name.

Sorry, if I am not clear. This would give more clear picture on the scenario.

I have a function dispatcher.

testcase_obj  = testcase() # A object of a class    
if command.startswith("test1"):    
    output = exec_test1()    
elif command.startswith("do_test"):    
    output = exec_do_test(testcase_obj)

Now, I want to wrap a function whenever user sends an option while executing the script. I changed above code as:

testcase_obj  = testcase() # A object of a class    
if command.startswith("test1"):    
    func = exec_test1() # Mistake, this should be func = exec_test1
elif command.startswith("do_test"):    
    func = exec_do_test(testcase_obj) # I don't know how assign exec_do_test along
                                      # with its parameter to 'func'. I don't want to
                                      # to call exec_to_test.

if option_given:    
    func = wrapper_func(func)    
    output = func() # At this point I don't how many parameters that "func" takes.
share|improve this question
3  
You'll need to give more specifics about what you're trying to do. It doesn't make sense to try to call a "mystery function" without knowing what arguments it accepts. Even if you can programmatically figure out how many arguments it takes and what their names are, how would you decide what values to pass for them without reading the documentation and knowing what they do? –  BrenBarn Oct 23 '12 at 6:19
    
Your edited question still doesn't really explain how you hope to make use of the wrapped function. Do you know what exec_test1() and exec_do_test(testcase_obj) return? If you do, then you know what func will be in each case, and how many arguments to pass in each case. If you don't, knowing how many arguments they take won't help you, because you still won't know what values you can meaningfully pass for those arguments. –  BrenBarn Oct 23 '12 at 7:03

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try the inspect module

import inspect
inspect.getargspec(func).args

will give:

['name']
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, it worked. –  rajpy Oct 23 '12 at 6:55

After saying func = test, func becomes just another name for test. So, you call func exactly the same way as test, and if you give func the wrong number of arguments you'll get a TypeError as if you had called test incorrectly.

For more information about the difference between variables in other languages and names in Python, see Code like a Pythonista.

share|improve this answer
    
If "test" takes variable number of arguments and it is assigned to "func". I want to know how many arguments that "func" has. Introspection(dir(func)) will not show how many arguments that "func" can take. –  rajpy Oct 23 '12 at 6:27
    
Well, dir(test) wouldn't tell you either. Remember, they are names for the same exact thing. You probably want help(func)... –  nneonneo Oct 23 '12 at 6:27

It will be the same.

func is just an alias to test, not a function calling test

share|improve this answer

If "test" takes variable number of arguments and it is assigned to "func". I want to know how many arguments that "func" has. Introspection(dir(func)) will not show how many arguments that "func" can take.

func is not a function. It is just an alias pointing to the function that is called test. So there is no way func can take a different number of arguments than test because func is not a function, just a name pointing to one. You can verify this:

>>> def test(arg1):
...    print 'test was given ',arg1
...
>>> func = test
>>> test.func_name
'test'
>>> func.func_name
'test'
>>> id(func)
3075004876L
>>> id(test)
3075004876L
>>> inspect.getargspec(func).args
['arg1']
>>> inspect.getargspec(test).args
['arg1']
share|improve this answer
    
func and test are absolutely equivalent. Both are names pointing to a function. So nothing special about func. –  glglgl Oct 23 '12 at 7:47
    
Thanks for the answer. Is it possible to assign 'test' along with its signature 'arg1' to 'func'? So that if I call func(), it should translate to the call test(arg1) –  rajpy Oct 23 '12 at 9:31

Yes there is a way if you give default values to your function.

def test(name="default",hi=0):
    print "name:", name,hi

func = test
func("testing")
func("testing",6) 
func(0)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.