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I have a function for starting processes on a local machine:

public int StartProcess(string processName, string commandLineArgs = null)
{
    Process process = new Process();
    process.StartInfo.FileName = processName;
    process.StartInfo.Arguments = commandLineArgs;
    process.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
    process.StartInfo.CreateNoWindow = true;
    process.StartInfo.ErrorDialog = false;
    process.StartInfo.WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden;
    process.Start();
    return process.Id;
}

It is supposed to start the process without opening a new window. Indeed, when I test it with timeout.exe no console window is opened. But when I test it with notepad.exe or calc.exe their windows still open.

I saw online that this method works for other people. I'm using .NET 4.0 on Windows 7 x64.

What am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
What is the source where it works for other people? –  Alvin Wong Oct 23 '12 at 6:53
1  
I don't think that there's a general way to launch another executable and then prevent that executable from deciding to open its own windows. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Oct 23 '12 at 6:59
    
I agree with @Damien_The_Unbeliever. Generally if a process decide to open a window, it requires user interaction, so it usually won't function without a window. Unlike console applications, where you can programmatically read and write to the standard input/output. –  Alvin Wong Oct 23 '12 at 7:07
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/3011209/…. Chris Schmich says that it works on his machine. @AlvinWong –  Dina Oct 23 '12 at 7:14
    
@Damien_The_Unbeliever Thanks. I will stick to hiding only console applications. –  Dina Oct 23 '12 at 7:32

3 Answers 3

You need to remove the process.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false

    public int StartProcess(string processName, string commandLineArgs = null)
    {
        Process process = new Process();
        process.StartInfo.FileName = processName;
        process.StartInfo.Arguments = commandLineArgs;
        process.StartInfo.CreateNoWindow = true;
        process.StartInfo.ErrorDialog = false;
        process.StartInfo.WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden;
        process.Start();
        return process.Id;
    }
share|improve this answer

Following program will show/hide the window:

using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
class Program
{
    [DllImport("user32.dll")]
    static extern IntPtr FindWindow(string lpClassName, string lpWindowName);

    [DllImport("user32.dll")]
    static extern bool ShowWindow(IntPtr hWnd, int nCmdShow);

    const int SW_HIDE = 0;
    const int SW_SHOW = 5;

    static void Main()
    {
        // The 2nd argument should be the title of window you want to hide.
        IntPtr hWnd = FindWindow(null, "Untitled - Notepad");
        if (hWnd != IntPtr.Zero)
        {
            //ShowWindow(hWnd, SW_SHOW);
            ShowWindow(hWnd, SW_HIDE); // Hide the window
        }
    }
}

Source: http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/csharplanguage/thread/1bc7dee4-bf1a-4c41-802e-b25941e50fd9

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2  
What do you see when you look at line 4 of the OPs StartProcess method? (Hmm. Maybe I miscounted, or maybe I subconsciously started counting from 0, but hopefully the point still works) –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Oct 23 '12 at 6:51
    
@Azodious But I did... Look in the code I posted. –  Dina Oct 23 '12 at 6:51
    
@Damien_The_Unbeliever: Yes, missed it. –  Azodious Oct 23 '12 at 7:14
    
@Dina: Check the updated answer now. –  Azodious Oct 23 '12 at 7:15

The CreateNoWindow flag applies to Console processes only.

See here for the details:

Secondly applications can ignore the WindowStyle argument - it has effect the first time the new application calls ShowWindow, but subsequent calls are under the control of the application.

share|improve this answer
    
This is why I added the Hidden WindowStyle. –  Dina Oct 23 '12 at 6:52

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