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I am very new to c++. Actually I am converting my code from c# to c++. The problem with my code is that I am getting the default value of some class variable, even though I have already set it to some other value. Partial code is as follows. Please help. node and cell are classes.

node nodes [10];
cell cells [10][10];
for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
            for (j = 0; j < n; j++)
            {
                cell c1;                    
                cells[i][j] = c1;
            }   

// mapping nodes to cells 
        for (i = 0; i < N; i++)
        {
            nodes[i] = node(i); 
            // depending upon some x and y, nodes are assigned to appropriate cells.            
            cellNodeCount = cells[x][y].appendNode(nodes[i]);                               
        }

Now in later code within the same class I am updating the flag of node.

for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
            for (j = 0; j < n; j++)
            { 
               cellNodeList = cells[i][j].getNodeList();

               //for some p
               cellNodeList[p].setNodeFlag(true);
            }

Later on, when I try to access the node flag, I always get false i.e., 0, even though the flag for that node was set to true.

The node class is as follows

class node
{
private:
     int nodeID;    
     bool Flag;

public:
    node(void){}
     ...

    void setNodeFlag(bool nodeFlag)
    {
        Flag = nodeFlag;
    }

    bool getNodeFlag()
    {
        return Flag;
    }     
};

Here is the cell class which contain getNodeList() function.

class cell
{
private:        
vector<node> nodeList;

public:

    int appendNode(node nod)
    {            
        nodeList.push_back(nod);           
        return nodeList.size();
    }



vector<node> getNodeList()
    {
        return nodeList;
    }

    int cellNodeCount()
    {
        return nodeList.size();
    }       

};
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3  
Does getNodeList() return a copy? If so, that's probably the cause of the problem. –  Fraser Oct 23 '12 at 7:06

3 Answers 3

A guess but there's only one answer that occurs to me. When you set the node flag you are setting it on a copy of the node, not on the original node you think you are setting it on. Remember the big difference between C# and C++. In C# your class variables are references to the underlying object, when you assign a variable you are copying the reference not the object. The opposite is true in C++, your class variables are the actual object, and when you assign one variable to another you are copying the actual object. This is sometimes called value semantics (C++) vs reference semantics (C# and Java).

How to fix it is impossible to say from the code you've posted. But you need to do something with pointers or references. Possibly your method getNodeList is copying the node list, instead of returning a reference to the existing node list.

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Yes, you have identified the problem correctly. But I am new to c++ and do not have much idea of pointers and references. How can I set the nodeflag using pointers, so that I update the actual flag rather than the copy? –  shaikh Oct 23 '12 at 7:23
    
It's not a pointer/reference to nodeflag that you need but a pointer/reference to it's containing object. It's the containing object that you want to avoid copying at some crucial point in your code. But very hard to give specific advice without seeing all the code. Did you look at the getNodeList method? Perhaps you should post that code here. –  john Oct 23 '12 at 8:27
    
@john I have posted the cell class with getNodeList method. –  shaikh Oct 23 '12 at 9:59
1  
Well there's your problem, you return a copy of the node list, then you operate on the copy of the node list and the originals are unchanged. This small change would fix it, vector<node>& getNodeList(). Note however although returning a reference to the node list fixes this particular problem it is a change to your code, and if you are using this method elsewhere in your code it could break that code (or fix it). No way for me to tell. Basically in C++ you need to understand the difference between copying objects and copying references or pointers to objects. –  john Oct 23 '12 at 10:04
    
@john Do I need any special variable (e.g. pointer varable) at the calling end of getNodeList() method or ordinary vector variable?. I am still getting the same problem even after making the above fix. –  shaikh Oct 23 '12 at 10:27

These loops look like they may create problems:

for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
    for (j = 0; j < n; j++)
    {
        cell c1;                    
        cells[i][j] = c1;
    }   

While you don't show the value of n, you use it for both loops. This means that if n is 10 (the outer dimension of the cells array) then you will access cells[i][j] out of bounds. You use this in the other nested loop as well.

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I suggest to cross check the double for loop, that might be creating problem.

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