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Say I have two tables a and b; the column id is unique in table a but has multiple entries in table b, with different values for column x as well as other columns in that table. The primary key of table b is (id,x).

I need to be able to join a single row from b to the SELECT query as I could do with MAX like so:

SELECT * FROM a
INNER JOIN b USING(id)
WHERE b.x = (SELECT MAX(x) FROM b WHERE b.id = a.id)

With MAX, this works no problem. But I don't need MAX. I actually need something like this:

SELECT * FROM a
INNER JOIN b USING(id)
WHERE b.x = (SELECT x FROM b 
             WHERE x IN (2,3,7) OR x IS NULL
             ORDER BY FIELD(x,3,2,7) DESC
             LIMIT 1)

This query fails because my MySQL version does not support LIMIT in this subquery. Is there another way to make sure to join at least and exactly one row in the order I provided?

Schematic overview of what I'm trying to do would be:

Select * from table a for each id
Join table b where x = 7
If no entry in b exists where a.id=b.id and x = 7, join b where x = 2
If no entry in b exists where a.id=b.id and x IN (2,7), join b where x = 3
If no entry in b exists where a.id=b.id and x IN (2,3,7), join b where x IS NULL

I have this need because:

  • I can't use more than one query in this particular bit of code I need; it has to be one magic all-in-one query
  • I can't use INNER JOIN (SELECT *) statements
  • I can't have a query where any id is present more than once (so DISTINCT is not option because the values in table b might differ)
  • I know for sure that table b has an entry for a.id where x is either 2, 3, 7 or NULL, but I don't know which and I also don't know how many entries there are for a.id in table b.
  • Upgrading MySQL is not the best option since this code would have to work on generic servers of any of my customers

So, in short, my question is: is there a function similar to MAX that can take a specific order into account instead of the MAX value?

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

You can do this by specifying manually the ordering weight of each X.

mysql> select * from aa;
+----+------+
| id | name |
+----+------+
|  1 | John |
|  2 | Ted  |
|  3 | Jill |
|  4 | Jack |
+----+------+
4 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> select * from bb;
+------+------+------------+
| id   | x    | class      |
+------+------+------------+
|    1 |    7 | HighPriori |
|    1 |    2 | MediumPrio |
|    1 |    3 | LowPriorit |
|    2 |    2 | Medium     |
|    2 |    3 | Low        |
|    3 |    3 | Low only   |
+------+------+------------+
5 rows in set (0.00 sec)


select version();
+-------------+
| version()   |
+-------------+
| 5.5.25a-log |
+-------------+

SELECT aa.name, bb.x, bb.class
    FROM aa LEFT JOIN bb ON (aa.id = bb.id AND bb.x IN (2,3,7)
        AND bb.x = ( SELECT x FROM bb WHERE bb.id = aa.id AND x IN (2,3,7)
           ORDER BY CASE
               WHEN x = 7 THEN 100
               WHEN x = 2 THEN 200
               WHEN x = 3 THEN 300
               ELSE 400
           END LIMIT 1 )
    );

The innermost SELECT will choose the most suitable value of X based on priority: 7 if available, else 2, else 3. This works also if, as in this case, the "priorities" are not in order, i.e., 7 is higher than 3, but 2 is also higher than 3.

Then the LEFT JOIN will match that one record, if it exists, or NULL, if it does not.

John has 2,3 and 7 and gets the 7-record, while Ted has 2 and 3, and gets the 2:

+------+------+------------+
| name | x    | class      |
+------+------+------------+
| John |    7 | HighPriori |
| Ted  |    2 | Medium     |
| Jill |    3 | Low only   |
| Jack | NULL | NULL       |
+------+------+------------+

(Strictly speaking, the IN (2,3,7) in the inner SELECT and the ELSE in the CASE are redundant; either will do).

In CASE of need...

If the X field already establishes an order, e.g., you want the values 3,2,7 in either 2 - 3 - 7 or 7 - 3 - 2 numeric order, you can do without the CASE: instead of

       ORDER BY CASE
           WHEN x = 7 THEN 100
           WHEN x = 2 THEN 200
           WHEN x = 3 THEN 300
           ELSE 400
       END 

you can just specify

       ORDER BY x

or

       ORDER BY x DESC

...the performance improvement is slight, even if x is indexed on, but if you have a great many values of X, then specifying them all in the CASE can be awkward, and studying exceptions may be lengthy.

But let's imagine you wanted the objects to be in this order

       First                          Last
       20,21,22,23,40,41,42,9,1,2,3,4,5

which typically arises when X is declared unsigned with values 1-5 ("we will never need more classes and 1 is always going to be first!"), then some weeks later someone adds a "this is a new exciting product, must go first!" exception and assigns 9 to it, and finally it happens again with "let's add a whole new XY class starting with 2X and 4X for the forthcoming product series...", you could do this as

       WHEN x <= 5 THEN 900+x
       WHEN x = 9   THEN 809
       ELSE 700 + x

which translates the above jumbled set in the ordered sequence

720,721,722,723,740,741,742,809,901,902,903,904,905

and with three WHENs you do all the work.

share|improve this answer
    
If I understand correctly, the subquery you're providing still yields multiple results. This way, I would still have to rely on the LIMIT 1 in the subquery. That's still not supported in MySQL 5.6 and below... If I don't understand correctly, then could you please provide some more info? Thanks! –  eleven59 Oct 23 '12 at 9:31
    
I don't know about changelogs for MySQL, but I can assure you that I tested the above, and found it working, on MySQL 5.5.25 . Also, I'm reasonably sure that I was using this technique on MySQL 5.1 (it might have been MySQL 5.2; it was some time ago). –  lserni Oct 23 '12 at 15:07
SELECT * FROM a
INNER JOIN b USING(id)
WHERE b.x = (SELECT x FROM b 
             WHERE x IN (2,3,7) OR x IS NULL
             ORDER BY FIELD(x,3,2,7) DESC
             LIMIT 1)

switch the subquery to a join

SELECT * FROM a
join ( SELECT x FROM b 
             WHERE x,id IN (2,3,7) OR x IS NULL
             ORDER BY FIELD(x,3,2,7) DESC
             LIMIT 1) as X on X.id = a.id 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your suggestion, but as I said, I can't use LIMIT in the subquery. Otherwise, my original approach would have already worked... –  eleven59 Oct 23 '12 at 9:27
    
@eleven59 This is a join :D –  Val Oct 24 '12 at 4:44

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