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I am not sure why this Perl sorting is not working. Please suggest how to resolve this.

while (<>) {

    chomp;
    if (/VIOLATE/) {

        @lines = split " ", $_;
        #print "$lines[-2]\n";  ## Print last but one column
        my @viol = "$lines[-2]\n";

        @sorted = sort {$a <=> $b} @viol;
        print "@sorted";
    }
};

Command : perl test.pl test.log

test.log :

0.98           2.04          -1.106  VIOLATE
0.98           2.04          3.06
0.98           2.04          -11.06  VIOLATE
0.98           2.04          -1.06  VIOLATE
0.98           2.04          1.06 
0.98           2.04          -0.226  VIOLATE
0.98           2.04          -2.06  VIOLATE
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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Are you trying to match any line with VIOLATE in it, put the result in an array then sort all the violations? If so you need to declare and sort @viol outside the loop:

use strict;
use warnings; # Don't forget these!

my @viol;

while (<>) {
    chomp;
    if (/VIOLATE/) {
        my @lines = split(/\s+/); # Split on one or more whitespace characters.
        push @viol, $lines[-2];
    }
}

# sort and print
my @sorted = sort {$a <=> $b} @viol;
print "@sorted";

This outputs: -11.06 -2.06 -1.106 -1.06 -0.226

share|improve this answer

Your sort works just fine. The only problem is that your array only has one element. Right above the sort, you do the assignment.

If you want this to work, you need to fill your array before you sort.

This is also a one-liner:

perl -lanwe 'push(@a, $F[-2]) if /VIOLATE/ }{ print for sort { $a <=> $b } @a' 

Note the use of the "Eskimo Kiss" operator, }{. It works in a way similar to an END { ... } block, in that whatever comes after it is executed at the end of the input.

For the curious: The "Eskimo Kiss" works because the switch -n adds a while(<>) { ... } loop around the -e program string, in a very literal way. Deparsed, it looks like this, with comments for clarity:

perl -MO=Deparse -lanwe 'push(@a, $F[-2]) if /VIOLATE/ }{ print for sort { $a <=> $b } @a'
BEGIN { $^W = 1; }                     # warnings enabled by -w
BEGIN { $/ = "\n"; $\ = "\n"; }        # line endings enabled by -l
LINE: while (defined($_ = <ARGV>)) {   # while(<>) loop added by -n
    chomp $_;                          # chomp added by -l
    our(@F) = split(' ', $_, 0);       # autosplit enabled by -a
    push @a, $F[-2] if /VIOLATE/;      # our code
}                                      # eskimo kiss close
{                                      # eskimo kiss open
    print $_ foreach (sort {$a <=> $b} @a);   # our END code
}                                      # closing bracket added by -n
-e syntax OK
share|improve this answer
    
Rather than deploy the Eskimo Kiss trick, IMO readers would be better served if you had written: `...VIOLATE/;END{print for sort {$a<=>$b} @a}' –  JRFerguson Oct 23 '12 at 11:24
3  
@JRFerguson It's not a trick, it just happens to fit with the code that is tacked on by the switches. I see your point, though, might be worth a note. –  TLP Oct 23 '12 at 11:34
1  
I understand that it ends a loop created by -p or -n, but that explanation is needed IMO. –  JRFerguson Oct 23 '12 at 11:47
1  
@JRFerguson Explanation added. But no, it doesn't actually work with -p, since it would become while (<>) { ... }{ ... } continue { print $_ }. It basically turns -p into -n, with a single print at the end. –  TLP Oct 23 '12 at 12:00
    
+1 for adding the explanation. –  JRFerguson Oct 23 '12 at 12:05

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