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Lot's of year from last project in C++, I cannot remember/find how to do this.

Sample (pseudo code) :

    MyClass
    {
    public :
        float x;
        float y;
        float z;
    }

    main.cpp

    void MyFunction(void)
    {
        MyClass *myclass = new MyClass(); 
        float x = myclass->x;

        //want I want :
        float *xyz = myclass->xyz;
    }

How to do this ?

Thank you very much and sorry for my poor english.

[EDITED] It's only a concept now, but the goal, is near the vec4 class in GLSL (OpenGL Shader for GPU). Vec4 is a math vector class with four values (x, y, z, w). You can get/assign value like this sample :

vec4 vectorA = vec4(1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0);
vectorA.x = 2.0;
vec2 vectorB = vectorA.xy;
vec3 vectorC = vectorA.xxx;

etc. (so : VectorC.x = 2.0, vectorC.y = 2.0, vectorC.z = 2.0)

share|improve this question
    
Um... What's xyz supposed to be? – Mysticial Oct 23 '12 at 8:08
    
An array containing [0] = x, [1] = y, [2] = z – chrisendymion Oct 23 '12 at 8:10
1  
Also see glm.g-truc.net (OpenGL Mathematics) to see how they do swizzling. – Charles Beattie Oct 23 '12 at 9:23
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Use unnamed structure:

union Vector
{
    struct 
    {
        float x;
        float y;
        float z;
    };
    float xyz[3];
};

Then you can access components without implicitly referencing containing structure:

int main()
{ 
    Vector* vec = new Vector();
    vec->x = 50;
    vec->y = 30;
    vec->xyz[2] = vec->xyz[0] + vec->xyz[1]; // vec->z == 80
    delete vec;
    return 0;
}

Of course, you can wrap this union with another structure/class, to same effect:

class MyClass
{
public:
    union
    {
        struct 
        {
            float x;
            float y;
            float z;
        };
        float xyz[3];
    };
};

Also, why create your structure on heap (using "new")? Won't allocating on stack do?

EDIT: Oh, I get it. Well, it's definitely doable, but it is worth it only if you want as much compability with GLSL as possible. The idea is to create a "proxy" that stores references for each component variation. The tradeof is that vec2, instead of taking 8 bytes of memory will take 40 bytes. It will obviously get much, much worse for vec3 & vec4

class vec2
{
    // private proxy, auto-convertible into vec2
    struct proxy2
    {
        // store references, not values!
        proxy2(float &x, float &y) : x(x), y(y) {}
        // implicit conversion to vec2
        operator vec2() { return vec2(x, y); }
        // support assignments from vec2
        proxy2& operator=(const vec2& vec) 
        { 
            x = vec.x; 
            y = vec.y; 
            return *this; 
        }
    private:
        // hide copy and assignment operators
        proxy2(const proxy2&);
        proxy2& operator=(const proxy2&);
        // hide member variables
        float& x;
        float& y;
    };

public:
    vec2(float _x, float _y) 
        : x(_x), y(_y) 
        , xx(x, x), xy(x, y), yx(y, x), yy(y, y)
    {}

    vec2(const vec2& vec)
        : x(vec.x), y(vec.y)
        , xx(x, x), xy(x, y), yx(y, x) , yy(y, y)
    {}

    float x;
    float y;
    proxy2 xx;
    proxy2 xy;
    proxy2 yx;
    proxy2 yy;
};

With this class you can get syntax pretty close to what GLSL offers:

vec2 v(1.0f, 2.0f);
vec2 vxx = v.xx; // 1, 1
vec2 vyx = v.yx; // 2, 1
vec2 vxy = v.xy; // 1, 2
vec2 vyy = v.yy; // 2, 2

v.yx = vec2(3, 4); // 4, 3
v.y = 5;           // 4, 5

vec2::proxy2 proxy = v.xx;     // compile error
v.xx = vec2::proxy2(v.x, v.y); // compile error

To extend this to support vec3 and vec4 simply derive from vec2 and vec3 respectively, create proxy3 and proxy4 structs and declare member for each component variation (27 for vec3 and mere 64 for vec4).

EDIT2: New version, that does not take extra space at all. Again, unions to the rescue! Converting proxy2 to a template and adding data member that matches vec2 components you can safely put it into an union.

class vec2
{
    // private proxy, auto-convertible into vec2
    template <int x, int y>
    struct proxy2
    {
        // implicit conversion to vec2
        operator vec2()
        { 
            return vec2(arr[x], arr[y]); 
        }
        // support assignments from vec2
        proxy2& operator=(const vec2& vec) 
        { 
            arr[x] = vec.x; 
            arr[y] = vec.y; 
            return *this; 
        }
    private:
        float arr[2];
    };

public:
    vec2(float _x, float _y) 
        : x(_x), y(_y) 
    {}

    vec2(const vec2& vec)
        : x(vec.x), y(vec.y)
    {}

    union
    {
        struct 
        {
            float x;
            float y;
        };
        proxy2<0, 0> xx;
        proxy2<0, 1> xy;
        proxy2<1, 0> yx;
        proxy2<1, 1> yy;
    };
};

Hope this is what you are after.

EDIT3: I took me a while, but I came up with a working GLSL emulation library (includes swizzling) allowing you to run fragment shaders without modifications. If you are still interested, you should take a look.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, it's close for what I want, but not exactly. How to get vec->xxx or other ? – chrisendymion Oct 23 '12 at 8:43
    
@chrisendymion: check out my edit. – gwiazdorrr Oct 23 '12 at 9:20
    
I wouldn't have them as members but construct them when needed. It will mean you have to use brackets to access the swizzled versions. – Charles Beattie Oct 23 '12 at 9:28
    
@chrisendymion: I thought you wanted to keep as close as possible to GLSL? – gwiazdorrr Oct 23 '12 at 9:46
    
Wow, what a great answer, thank you so much for you help and for your time !! Yes, it's exactly what I wanted ;) – chrisendymion Oct 23 '12 at 10:55

C++ can accommodate syntax like vec.xyx, but it's not easy to write. And you won't get there by adding features one by one. It's better to list the requirements, select the tools, and make a straight shot.

What you need:

  1. A storage class like std::array
  2. Members named x, y, … xy, xz, … xyz, xzx, …
  3. Something that converts those members to the desired output
  4. Types to give the output the desired semantics

The first requirement is simple: use std::array.

Next you have to define 3 + 3^2 + 3^3 = 39 members. This can be done by copy-paste but you're better off with template metaprogramming. With a z member it's a must.

The types of the members are meaningless, but must tell the compiler how to choose the named elements from the array.

Example:

selection_vector< 0, 1, 0 > xyx;
selection_vector< 0, 1, 1 > xyy; // ad nauseam

Ideally these members would know how to select the elements with no state, but they will need to be initialized with this and take up one pointer each. So be aware that each 3-vector object wastes 312 bytes.

To make the members do something, you have to define conversion functions. So you have something like

selection_vector::operator array3_type() { return { ptr[0], ptr[1], ptr[2] }; }

Implicit conversion functions apply when performing assignment and passing as a function argument besides this, but not in many other situations. So to obtain vec.xyx.x or vec.xyx[ 1 ] the selection_vector type would need to define additional members.

Once you've defined the web of crazy types and operator overloads, you'll be able to save a few keystrokes…

Minor compromise

It sounds like you don't really want to compromise, but the ->* operator is worth mentioning. It's the best non-member operator overload for implementing subscripts.

This allows a pattern like

xyx_type xyx;

template< typename vec >
my_3vector< vec > operator->* ( vec &&v, xyx_type )
    { return { v[0], v[1], v[2] }; }

std::array< float, 3 > a { 0.5, 1.5, 9 };

my_3vector< … > b = a->*xyx;

You could even make my_3vector simply std::array and avoid any template metaprogramming. Make xyx_type an enumeration to avoid preprocessor metaprogramming too.

The ->* operator stands in for .. This makes things a lot easier, but note that ->* has funny precedence; it's lower than . and -> whereas you would expect it to be a peer.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for your answer and your time ! If I could, I would choose both your answer and giazdorrr's answer as valid. – chrisendymion Oct 23 '12 at 10:57

Here is another solution possible, a slight variation to union-based example posted by @gwiazdorrr. It assumes

#include <cassert>
#include <algorithm>
#include <stdexcept>

struct MyClass
{
    enum { size = 3 };

    typedef float& reference;
    reference x;
    reference y;
    reference z;

    MyClass() 
        : x(xyz[0] = 0), y(xyz[1] = 0), z(xyz[2] = 0)
    {}
    MyClass(float x, float y, float z)
        : x(xyz[0] = x), y(xyz[1] = y), z(xyz[2] = z)
    {}
    MyClass& operator=(MyClass const& other)
    {
        std::copy(other.xyz, other.xyz + size, xyz);
        return *this;
    }

    // convenient indexed access
    reference operator[](std::size_t index)
    {
        if (index < size)
            return xyz[index];
        else
            throw std::out_of_range("index not less than size");
    }

    // raw data access
    float* data() { return xyz; }

private:
    float xyz[size];
};

int main()
{
    MyClass c1;
    MyClass c2(1, 2, 3);
    c1 = c2;
    assert(c1.data()[0] == c2[0]);
    assert(c1.data()[1] == c2[1]);
    assert(c1.data()[2] == c2[2]);

    MyClass c3(c2);
    assert(c2[0] == c3.x);
    assert(c2[1] == c3.y);
    assert(c2[2] == c3.z);
}

I assumed no access to C++11, thus the initialisation gymnastics in the constructors.

share|improve this answer

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